Career interview

From: Caroline DeLong (delong@hawaii.edu)
Date: Mon Feb 07 2000 - 15:38:27 EST


At 04:16 PM 02/03/2000 -1000, you wrote:
>HELLO, My name is Roxianne. I live in California and am a highschool
>student. I am also taking a class called Career Preparation and I am very
>interested in working with animals espesially marine ones. About a 2 months
>ago I took my second trip to Maui and was thrilled to see dolphins in the
>wild and up so close for the first time. Anyways I'm doing an interview
>project at school and I was wondering if you could anser a few questions...
>
>1. What kind of courses would I need to take to be a marine
>biologist?
>
>2. How much might these courses cost?
>
>3. What are some of the different areas of marine biology that I
>could go into?
>
>4. Do you specialize in anything?
>
>5. Would you consider this job to pay good?
>
> I hope you can find sometime to answer a few of my questions, it would
>help a great deal with my career decsions. THANKS FOR YOUR TIME.
>
>roxz2003@hotmail.com

Hi Roxianne,

There is a wonderful website you will want to visit to help you get a
better idea of how to prepare for a career in marine mammal science. See-

Strategies for Pursuing a Career in Marine Mammal Science
http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~smm/strat.htm

There usually aren't many marine mammal courses in most colleges, but the
best advice is really to obtain a strong science background and become a
good writer. Also, do an internship or volunteer in the field before you
decide on a career. Get a taste of how you will be spending your time.
Talk to a variety of people who work with marine mammals (like you are
doing now!)- trainers, researchers, those who work in government, etc.

To answer your questions about me- I specialize in marine mammal cognition
and acoustics. I also study human cognition and development (in
psychology). My current research involves investigating echolocation
signals in bottlenosed dolphins.

I wouldn't say the pay is great, but nobody goes into this field in search
of high paychecks. If you can get a job, the pay will most likely be enough
to support you, but not in luxury. I know a lot of happy marine mammal
scientists though! The work can be quite satisfying.

Good luck!
Caroline
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Caroline DeLong
Marine Mammal Research Program
Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
P.O. Box 1106
Kailua, HI 96734
delong@hawaii.edu



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