Ancient Whale fossils

From: Greg Early (gearly1@earthlink.net)
Date: Wed Jun 04 2003 - 15:21:40 EDT

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    Levy,

    See, the Incas had this giant theme park .... Just kidding, I was making
    that up.

    Although scientists think that some species of extinct whales had little
    legs, they also agree that the legs were too small to support the whales on
    land. Kind of a neat image though ... big whale walking around on those
    skinny little legs. Anyway, most scientists also think that it was not so
    much a matter of the ancient whales climbing up what are now mountains, but
    that the mountains grew up under where the ancient whales once lived (and
    died). It would work something like this... Some species of ancient whale
    type animals lived in areas that were either shallow coastal or inland
    seas. In some cases after those whale died and were preserved as fossils,
    the land they were on changed shape and elevation as the continents moved
    around into their present position. (Most scientists agree that the
    continents were in very different positions millions of years ago and are
    in slow, but constant motion.) As the continents moved around (sort of
    like giant slow bumper cars) in some places where they bumped into each
    other the coast was squashed up into mountains. The sea floor (where the
    fossil were buried) ended up on what are today mountains.

    Regards,

    ge

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Magodblessu@aol.com [SMTP:Magodblessu@aol.com]
    Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2003 5:41 PM
    To: gearly1@earthlink.net; pita@whale.wheelock.edu
    Subject: Ancient Whale fossils

    How did ancient whales at altittudes of more than 1524 meters found in the
    remote plateau of the Andes Mountains in southern Chile. Did they walk ,
    how
    did they get there please explain.

    levy
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