Subject: Careers

Steve Frohock (Sfrohock@tiac.net)
Wed, 30 Oct 1996 10:25:19 -0800

podolsk@bgnet.bgsu.edu wrote:
> 
> I am a student at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green,
> Ohio.  I am interested in finding a career that involves working with
> dolphins, whales, sea lions, etc.  I would enjoy training these
> animals for awhile, and then advancing on to bigger things. For
> example, cruising the ocean watching the whales. Diving to get a
> better look at ocean mammals.  I know this all sounds like fantasy,
> and a career involves much harder work. I don't know what the name of
> this career is. I am currently majoring in biology with a minor in
> science. My college does not focus mainly on marine science. In the
> catalog of classes to take, the marine ones require me to go to a
> school in the Gulf Coast for a summer. I am also going to take scuba
> next semester and get my certification. Can you please send me some
> information that might give me a better idea of the field I want to
> get in to? Sorry, this message isn't better organized, I have a class
> to get to.
>                                   Sincerely,
>                                    Christina

Dear Christina, The field you're looking for is called Cetology, derived 
from the Mammalian Order Cetacea, which includes all whales, dolphins and 
porpoises. There are many avenues of study to get into the field. You 
could study marine biology, oceanograghy, animal behavior (either 
psychology or biology), computer science or even ichthyology to study the 
whales food sources. There are also many organizations that offer intern 
programs to introduce you to the field. Check some of the member groups 
of WhaleNet for intern info.

Finally, while it seems very romantic to think of diving or swimming with 
whales, it is both dangerous and illegal in the U.S.

Steve