Subject: Re: interview

Dr. Cathy Schaeff (schaeff@american.edu)
Mon, 06 Jan 1997 09:17:25 +0000

Dear Gabriel,

I hope that this info helps!

Dr. Schaeff


1 What are the positive aspects of your job?  I get to do work that I
enjoy and to work on projects that I think are important.  I enjoy field
work -- being on the ocean all day, watching (or watching for) whales as
well as doing lab work which helps to quantify the behavioral and
ecological info obtained in the field.

2.what are the educ. qualifications needed? I have a Ph.D. but it varies
hugely depending on what you want to do as a marine biologist.  There is
a 'how to' booklet put out by the Society for the Study of Marine
Mammals (call Allen Press, 1-800-627-0629 for a copy).

3.Is there travel involved in your job? Yes, I travel to various
locations to study a number of ewhale species (Nova Scotia for harbor
seals, British Columbia for gray whales, Maine for right whales).

4.What are your daily job responsibilities? I am a professor so my job
includes teaching a number of courses, training graduate students,
organizing and running a molecular geentics lab, training people in my
lab, carring out my own research and publishing my work.

5.Do you work alone? It depends which hat I am wearing -- I generally do
my own lab work alone but a always work with others when I am in the
field.

6.What are your hours of work per week? As a professor I work about 60
to 70 hours a week -- more in the summer (our so-called 'break',
depending on whether I am in the field or not).

7.What are your job benefits? Financial or emotional?  I am lucky in
that I have a permanent job at my university -- many marine biologists
work on contract or seasonal jobs with little job security.  As a
professor I recieve health care benefits, retirements, etc. as well as
my salary. Emotionally -- I am getting paid for something that I love to
do -- study marine mammals and do science and teach others about it.
  
8.What are the negative if about your job?  Like most professors (and
many other professions), it is a tiring job -- it doesn't end when you
go home, there is always something left uncompleted.

9.What is your field work atmosphere like? Depends where I am and who I
am working with.  Generally I found my collaborators and assistants to
be terrific, interested in the project, willing to work hard without
complaint and have fun doing it.

10.Are there any negative aspects to your job?  see # 8