Subject: Career Question in MM bio

Michael Williamson (williams@whale.simmons.edu)
Thu, 6 Feb 1997 09:11:50 -0500 (EST)

Hi,
I know that this is "late." But, maybe better late than never.  See below.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
J. Michael Williamson
   Principal Investigator-WhaleNet <http://whale.wheelock.edu>
   Associate Professor-Science
   Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215
voice: 617.734.5200, ext. 256
fax:    617.734.8666, or 508.468.0073
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On Thu, 16 Jan 1997, Carmela M. Federico wrote:

> Hi my name is Mir and I go to Crossroads in california. I am working on
> a project about science carreers and need a marine bioligist to answer
> the following questions:
> 
> What influenced you to choose this career?
I think the excitement in knowing that I coulkd do  something new and
undone, aside from being on the water and observing whales/marine mammals,
etc.
> What is the most interesting thing about this career?
Always observing something new and different, the opportunity for
discovery, and contribution to the knowledge of these animals.


> Describe a typical day in this profession.
VARIED.  You can spend a day on the water photographing, collecting data
and/or whale feces.  You could be in the office inputting data, working in
the darkroom, or cooking lunch and fixing an outboard motor.  You have to
be a jack of all trades.



> What skills are required?
Data analysis, photography, boat handling, patience, a little insanity,
math, geography, .....


> What education is required?
Formal and informal,  volunteering for field experience in VERY valuable
as is the formal classes upon which you base  some of  your work.  Some
classes give mixed messages, but that sorts itself out.


> What branch of science is connected with it?
ALL branches-turely interdisciplinary.

> Where do this type of scientist work?
All over the world--from the nice comfy areas like Maui to the Antarctic.
It depends on what you want to study and how much you can tolerate in
relation to temp, sun, bugs, camping, food, etc.

> What is significant about this career?
The potential for discovery and contribution to science, the marine
mammals, and to yourself.

> Does this career leave you with spare time?
That depends on how invested you are and how driven you become.  For many,
"My work is my play" is an accurate quote.  This is NOT a 9 to 5 job.


Mike Williamson