Subject: Humpback Whales (fwd)

Michael Williamson (pita@whale.simmons.edu)
Fri, 25 Apr 1997 10:20:47 -0400 (EDT)

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
J. Michael Williamson
   Principal Investigator-WhaleNet <http://whale.wheelock.edu>
   Associate Professor-Science
   Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215
voice: 617.734.5200, ext. 256
fax:    617.734.8666, or 617.566.7369
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 1997 20:50:02 -0400 (EDT)
From: "w. jones" <mermaid@grove.ufl.edu>
To: 2675@together.cudenver.edu, S@together.cudenver.edu,
    Decatur@together.cudenver.edu, St@together.cudenver.edu,
    Denver@together.cudenver.edu, Co@together.cudenver.edu,
    80465@together.cudenver.edu
Cc: pita@whale.simmons.edu, krill@whale.simmons.edu
Subject: Re: Humpback Whales

Hi Denise and Shannon,

Your program sounds exciting.  I hope it is going well. 

Humpback whales are found in all the world's oceans.  They breed in the
tropics and travel almost to the edges of the pack-ice in the Arctic
and the Antarctic Oceans.  There appear to be three geographically
isolated populations.
They are found in the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and in the oceans
of the Southern Hemisphere. Humpback whales migrate to various cold 
water feeding grounds in the summer and warm water  breeding grounds in
the winter. Humpbacks grow to about 19 m (62 ft) in length and may weigh
up to 48 tons.  At the present time, Humpbacks are not endangered.  The
most interesting thing about humpbacks is their song.  Humpbacks make
eerie, haunting vocalizations that can be heard through the hulls of boats
floating above them.  Scientist aren't sure why the whales sing, but they
speculate that it may be related to reproduction.  Only mature male  
whales sing.  There are tapes available at some record stores and nature
shops that you can listen to and hear the whales' songs for yourself.  You
can also check out the book "Whales of the World" by Nigel Bonner to find
out more information about humpbacks and other whales in the oceans.

I hope I have answered your questions.  If you have any more, drop me a
line.  Good luck with your program and have a nice day.


Wanda Jones



On Sun, 21 Apr 1996, Scott Holloway wrote:

> Hi! We are from College View Elementary in Denver, Colorado.  We are
> studying humpback whales.  In our class we are doing a program called
> Voyage of the Mimi.  
> We are looking to find where humpback whales live, the average weight
> and size, if they are endangered, and a interesting fact about
> humpbacks.
> We are using our teachers computer. 
> Here is his E-mail address: Scott_Holloway@together.cudenver.edu
> Our names are Denise Sanchez and Shannon Chambers.
> 
> 						Thank You,
> 						Denise and Shannon
> 						Denver, Colorado
>