Subject: Migration/whales

Michael Williamson (pita@whale.simmons.edu)
Thu, 1 May 1997 14:41:14 -0400 (EDT)

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---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 1 May 1997 14:40:12 -0400 (EDT)
From: "w. jones" <mermaid@grove.ufl.edu>
To: Ann Marie Dlott <adlott@shrewsbury.k12.ma.us>
Cc: pita@whale.simmons.edu, krill@whale.simmons.edu
Subject: Re: Endangered Whales

Hello Mrs. Ballard,

I am not sure that I understand exactly what you are asking but I will
answer to the best of my ability.  Whales are migratory animals so they do
not spend their whole life in one area.  Whales that you are likely to see
in New England waters during their migrations to the colder waters of the
N. Atlantic are right whales, fin whales, and humpback whales.  Grey
whales were hunted
to extinction in N. Atlantic waters during the 18th century.  Perhaps as
grey whale numbers increase, some will venture into the N. Atlantic.  It
would be rare, but if you are lucky, you might see a blue whale as they
migrate to their feeding areas.


Whales that are endanger of extinction in the world's oceans are right
whales and blue whales.  They have been endangered for several decades,
however, with the decrease in the number of countries that participate in
whaling, these whales appear to be making a come back.  The future looks
hopeful for them.

I hope I have answered your question.  If you have any more, drop me a
line.  Have a good weekend.

W. Jones

On Wed, 30 Apr 1997, Ann Marie Dlott wrote:

> Dear Wanda,
>     We are a second grade class in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. We 
> have been studying whales and would like to know - What whale is 
> becoming endangered in the New England waters?
>      Thank you,
>      Mrs. Ballard
>