Subject: [Fwd: Re: Orca pods]

Dr. Cathy Schaeff (schaeff@american.edu)
Mon, 06 Oct 1997 10:01:59 +0000

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-- 
Dr. Cathy Schaeff
Biology Department 
American University
4400 Mass. Ave. N.W. 
Washington D.C. 20016-8007
(202) 885-2175 (phone)
(202) 885-2182 (fax)
schaeff@american.edu (email)

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Date: Mon, 06 Oct 1997 10:01:16 +0000
From: "Dr. Cathy Schaeff" <schaeff@american.edu>
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Subject: Re: Orca pods
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hogsed wrote:
> 
> I keep seeing that there are three different pods in the waters
> surrounding the San Juan Islands.  What I can't figure out is what are
> the names of these three pods.
>                                 B
>                                 -@ufl.edu
Hi B,

 There are three primary types of orca societies have been identified:
offshore, resident, and transient. 
Pods contain between 3 and 40 animals and they often cooperate in
hunting and feeding actiities. Resident whales typically remain near the
surface, breathing and swimming in a pattern; they may even breathe in
unison. This 'keeping in step' with one another could be a way of
helping the pod keep tabs on one another.  Transient orcas eat other
marine mammals and have even been known to attack whales, including the
enormous blue whale. 
Hope this helps.  Cathy Schaeff
-- 
Dr. Cathy Schaeff
Biology Department 
American University
4400 Mass. Ave. N.W. 
Washington D.C. 20016-8007
(202) 885-2175 (phone)
(202) 885-2182 (fax)
schaeff@american.edu (email)


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