Subject: Sperm Whales population estimates/population status

Courtney Stirling Casey (stirling@gsosun1.gso.uri.edu)
Wed, 5 Nov 1997 13:46:14 -0500 (EST)

Hi,
	The latest statistics I have for you are:
The original population estimates suggest that the sperm whale population
was once at 2.4 million individuals.  Current estimates of the population
size suggest that 1.95 million sperm whales are alive today.  So, there
has been a decline in the population over time, but the US Government
lists the species as at it's optimum sustainable population - meaning that
the sperm whales that are in the oceans are eating as much food and using
as much space as the ocean has to offer.  The IUCN however, differs from
the US and states that not enough is known about the sperm whale
population to be able to formulate a solid population status.  As you
probably know from your research already, sperm whales can dive for 
extended periods of time (in comparison to other whales) and live in very
deep waters.  Both of these life history characteristics make them a bit
more difficult to study than a coastal species like the humpback.  Hope
this helps.  Let me know if I can answer any more questions and good luck
with your report.

Courtney


> Date: Wed, 5 Nov 1997 00:29:05 -0500 (EST)
> From: AN87@aol.com
> To: stirling@gsosun1.gso.uri.edu, pita@whale.wheelock.edu
> Subject: Sperm Whales
> 
> Dear Courtney,
>       I'm a 5th grader and I'm doing a project on Sperm Whales.  My group and
> I are having a little trouble with Sperm Whale statistics based on how many
> are left and if they are endangered.  Can you please help us.
>