Subject: Evolution in echolocation

Martine Berube (mberube@ulb.ac.be)
Tue, 12 May 1998 14:14:12 +0200 (MET DST)

Dear Jenny,
Unfortunately, I did not find a website with the full text of papers on
beluga echolocation. However, you will below two papers with their
abstracts, one that I have pasted and the other I have given you the website
address. I hope it will be of some help.
Good luck,

Martine

1- TURL CW; SKAAR DJ; AU WW.
     THE ECHOLOCATION ABILITY OF THE BELUGA (DELPHINAPTERUS-LEUCAS) TO DETECT
   TARGETS IN CLUTTER.
     JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, 1991 FEB, V89 N2:896-901.
     

2- TURL CW; PENNER RH.
     DIFFERENCES IN ECHOLOCATION CLICK PATTERNS OF THE BELUGA
   (DELPHINAPTERUS-LEUCAS) AND THE BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN (TURSIOPS-TRUNCATUS)
     JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, 1989 AUG, V86 N2:497-502.
 

3- J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 86, No. 2, August 1989 Pages 497 - 502

Differences in echolocation click patterns of the beluga (Delphinapterus
leucas) and the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) 

Charles W. Turl Ralph H. Penner 

Naval Ocean System Center, Hawaii Laboratory, Kailua, Hawaii 96734-0997 

(Received 7 March 1988; accepted for publication 7 March 1989) 

In an echolocation experiment, the target detection performance of a beluga
and a bottlenose dolphin were similar, but each
produced different patterns of echolocation click trains. The beluga emitted
three different patterns of echolocation clicks. A
pattern I click train started with low-amplitude clicks, followed by packets
of clicks. A packet contained several clicks with
interclick intervals less than the two-way travel time to the target; the
interpacket intervals were greater than the two-way
travel time. A pattern II click train consisted of a combination of
individual clicks, some with intervals less than and some
greater than the two-way travel time. This pattern did not contain packets.
The third pattern of click trains consisted of
individual clicks with interclick intervals less than the two-way travel
time. However, the bottlenose dolphin always
emitted clicks with interclick intervals greater than the two-way travel
time. These differences in click patterns suggest that
the beluga has a different echolocation strategy than the bottlenose dolphin. 

4- http://www.virtual-mktg.com/schiroa/refs/Au-Nachtigall1997.html


Question:
At 07.27 PM 12-05-1998 +1000, you wrote:
I am doing a research paper on the evolution of echolocation in Beluga
whales. There are very few journal articles available in Australia on
this particular subject. If you could possible direct me to sites which
have full articles on the internet about this topic it would be very
helpful and much appreciated.
Thank you for your time
Jenny

logans@eagles.com.au

Martine Berube
Unit of Evolutionary Genetics
Department of Molecular Biology
Free University of Brussels (ULB)
CP 244
Bld du Triomphe
B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 650 5427
Fax: +32 2 650 5421
Email: mberube@ulb.ac.be