Subject: Blue whale endangerment

Martine Berube (mberube@ulb.ac.be)
Mon, 18 May 1998 10:57:10 +0200 (MET DST)

Here some info about the blue whale status found at the following website
(http://kingfish.ssp.nmfs.gov/tmcintyr/cetacean/blue.html). To have
information about other marine mammals status, please look at the following
site (http://www.fws.gov/r9endspp/vertdata.html#Mammals)
Sincerely,
Martine

"The blue whale was listed as endangered throughout its range on June 2,
1970 under the Endagered Species Conservation Act of 1969. Blue whales are
severely depleted in all oceans of the world. The population status of blue
whales in the Northern Hemisphere is unknown. Sightings have increased off
central California and on the Pacific coast of Mexico and Central America,
but these increases may be attributed to increased observer effort rather
than trends in abundance. Blue whales have been studied in the Gulf of
California, Mexico and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, but trends in
abundance were not apparent. An increasing trend in abundance of 5.1 percent
was reported between 1979 and 1988 west of Iceland. The status of blue
whales in the southern hemisphere is uncertain. Only seven sightings of
calves have been made below 60=B0S. since 1965. An analysis of 6 years of
sightings in Antarctic waters collected by the International Whaling
Commission suggests that blue whales may not be recovering from commercial
whaling. However, the general opinion is that the Antarctic stock is
certainly larger than 500 animals, with a considerably larger population for
the entire southern hemisphere."=20

At 11.56 AM 17-05-1998 EDT, you wrote:
> Hi I'd like to know- is a blue whale endangered? If not can you give me a=
 few
>who are?
>
>
Martine Berube
Unit of Evolutionary Genetics
Department of Molecular Biology
Free University of Brussels (ULB)
CP 244
Bld du Triomphe
B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 650 5427
Fax: +32 2 650 5421
Email: mberube@ulb.ac.be