Subject: Subject: marine mammal research, high school students

Center for Oceanic Research and Education (core@coreresearch.org)
Sun, 16 Aug 1998 21:19:41 -0400

To whom it may concern, 
	Hello, my name is Krystle.  At my school in NY I participate in a
three-year
science research course.  I chose the behavior of cetaceans as my topic.
However, throughout the past year, I have noticed that it is difficult for
a
high school student interested in conducting marine mammal research to find
a
mentor.  
	Personally, I am a very enthusiastic researcher and would love the
opportunity to work with cetaceans but I am wondering if I am going to have
any success in this field as long as I am in high school.  Should I drop
this
topic, pursue opportunities in another research area, and wait until
college
to reenter the field of marine mammal behavior?  Or should I keep on
attempting to find a mentor in my current field of study, and if so, how
and
where do you recommend I find one?
	Any advice would be appreciated.  I have always been a passionate
conservationist and  an animal lover; I was hoping that through this course
I
would be able to conduct research on an area of interest and contribute as
much as I can offer to the conservation of marine mammals.  Is there a
reason
for the refusal of many research centers to be open to high school
researchers?
	Thank you very much for your time and I hope that you can assist me with
my
endeavors.
                                                         Sincerely,  
Krystle
B. C. 

Dear Krystle,

Generally, the minimum requirement for those wanting to assist in research
is a basic background in collegiate biology. Because this particular field
is so competetive, those positions are generally reserved for college
students that are looking to pursue this as a career and/or are receiving
college credits for their work. Such positions can be very demanding,
requiring great dedication and long hours of work. There may be certain
exceptions to this if the applicant displays the motivation and desire
needed to fill the position. If you would like to pursue this endeavor,
there is a wealth of information on careers and schooling in the field of
marine mammology through the WhaleNet web site.  Feel free to use the link
on the WhaleNet site called  ed_resources page. It may help you in
answering any more questions you may have.

Good Luck!

Josh Miller
CORE Asst Director








----------
> From: KBlair11@aol.com
> To: core@coreresearch.org; pita@whale.wheelock.edu;
kburnett@whale.wheelock.edu
> Subject: conducting marine mammal research as a high school student
> Date: Wednesday, August 12, 1998 10:00 PM
> 
> To whom it may concern, 
> 	Hello, my name is Krystle.  At my school in NY I participate in a
three-year
> science research course.  I chose the behavior of cetaceans as my topic.
> However, throughout the past year, I have noticed that it is difficult
for a
> high school student interested in conducting marine mammal research to
find a
> mentor.  
> 	Personally, I am a very enthusiastic researcher and would love the
> opportunity to work with cetaceans but I am wondering if I am going to
have
> any success in this field as long as I am in high school.  Should I drop
this
> topic, pursue opportunities in another research area, and wait until
college
> to reenter the field of marine mammal behavior?  Or should I keep on
> attempting to find a mentor in my current field of study, and if so, how
and
> where do you recommend I find one?
> 	Any advice would be appreciated.  I have always been a passionate
> conservationist and  an animal lover; I was hoping that through this
course I
> would be able to conduct research on an area of interest and contribute
as
> much as I can offer to the conservation of marine mammals.  Is there a
reason
> for the refusal of many research centers to be open to high school
> researchers?
> 	Thank you very much for your time and I hope that you can assist me with
my
> endeavors.
>                                                          Sincerely,  
Krystle
> B. C.