Subject: [Fwd: Marine Biologist questions]

Phil Clapham (phillip.clapham@noaa.gov)
Mon, 11 Jan 1999 07:42:20 -0500

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Phillip J. Clapham, Ph.D.
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
166 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543

tel (508) 495-2316
fax (508) 495-2066
Internet: phillip.clapham@noaa.gov
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Message-ID: <3699F194.CBC29919@noaa.gov>
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 07:41:56 -0500
From: Phil Clapham <phillip.clapham@noaa.gov>
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To: "Robert G. Hanson" <rghanson@iamerica.net>
Subject: Re: Marine Biologist questions
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Hi Kristy:

Answers to your questions:

1. Salary depends on what kind of job, and what kind of training you
have.  If you get a PhD and manage to find a job, it is much better paid
than if you don't have the doctorate.  Salaries vary, and some people
make more than $60,000 a year, but they tend to be people who've been in
the field a long time and who therefore much experience.  Other salaries
are much lower.  The main thing is that no one gets into this field for
money - you do it because you love it, and if you happen to get a
well-paid job at some point, so much the better!

2. Training: if you really want to work with marine mammals and do
research, then you need an advanced degree (Masters or PhD) to get
anywhere.  Biology or zoology is the preferred area.

3. It is pretty hard to get a job in marine mammal science; it's very
competitive and there aren't many paying jobs.  But don't let that worry
you.  If you really want to do it, then go for it - just recognize that
it won't be a secure, easy existence the way many careers are.  But it
also will be a lot more fun than most other careers!

Phil Clapham


Robert G. Hanson wrote:
> 
> I am thinking of becoming a marine biologists.  I love whales and
> especially dolphins.  I think it is very interesting how they
> communicate with each other and with people.  I was wondering about a
> few questions.  1.  What is the average salary per year?  2. What
> training does it take to be a marine biologists?  3.  Is it hard to get
> a job in marine biology?
>   Thanks a bunch,
>      Kristy

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Phillip J. Clapham, Ph.D.
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
166 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543

tel (508) 495-2316
fax (508) 495-2066
Internet: phillip.clapham@noaa.gov

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