Subject: sleep (fwd)

Mike Williamson (pita@www1.wheelock.edu)
Tue, 19 Jan 1999 14:33:34 -0500 (EST)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 08:06:34 -0500
From: Phil Clapham <phillip.clapham@noaa.gov>
To: RAINIERMEC@aol.com
Cc: pita@whale.wheelock.edu, kburnett@whale.wheelock.edu
Subject: sleep

Hi:

Not sure what the second part of your question means (right back?).  The
first: whales probably don't sleep in the way we think of it.  They're
voluntary breathers so they have to think to breathe (not surprising for
an animal that dives).  What they may do - and what at least some
dolphins do - is sleep half their brain at a time, so the other half
stays awake to keep them breathing.

Some whales "sleep" on the surface (like humpbacks sometimes), some
probably sleep underwater.

Phil Clapham


RAINIERMEC@aol.com wrote:
> 
> WERE DO WHALES SLEEP AND HOW RIGHT BACK.

-- 



Phillip J. Clapham, Ph.D.
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
166 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543

tel (508) 495-2316
fax (508) 495-2066
Internet: phillip.clapham@noaa.gov