Subject: Gray Whale's in Danger

Al Romero (romero@macalester.edu)
Thu, 11 Feb 1999 16:56:57 -0600

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> Dear Dr. Romero,
> Hello, my name is David Sparacino.  I've recently heard of a proposed
plan to
> build a saltworks plant on the shores of San Ignacio Lagoon by the
Mitsubishi
> company and the Mexican government.  What is being done to stop them from
> doing so?
>  
> Also, How has the drilling of oil in the Beaufort and Bering seas affected
> Bowhead whale migration routes?  Is there still a strict quota enforced
> regarding their killing?  They are by far my favourite whale species.
>  
> Thank you for your time.
> Sincerely,
> David Sparacino


There is nothing definite regarding the situation of the San Ignacio Lagoon in
Baja California. The issue has certainly been raised by many environmental
groups.  This is a developing story, so i would suggest that you subscribe to
the two sources that can keep you up to date with news: one is marmam
(subscribe at marmamed@uvic.ca).  The other is to subscribe to cetacean-news
(you can do at majordomo@orcas.net).

Regarding the problem of the effects of noise from drilling platforms in
Alaskan waters on bowhead migrations, we know very little at this point. 
Acoustic studies have been conducted to analyze these sounds, but there little
information about its effects and/or adaptations of marine mammals.  the few
relevant data on sound masking have come  large from studies of high-frequency
echolocation by toothed whales.

Yes, there are quotas for "scientific" and aboriginal whaling which is
still as
source of controversy because many dispute that neither type of whaling really
served the intended purposes (scientific research an cultural preservation).
Yet some countries still practice whaling and some flagless, "pirate" ships
have also been reported as being involved in whaling.

Best wishes,




Aldemaro Romero, Ph.D.
Director and Associate Professor
Environmental Studies Program
Macalester College
1600 Grand Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55105-1899
(651) 696-8157
(651) 696-6443 (fax)
romero@macalester.edu 

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At 09:24 PM 2/10/99 -0500, you wrote:
Dear Dr. Romero,
Hello, my name is David Sparacino.  I've recently heard of a proposed plan to build a saltworks plant on the shores of San Ignacio Lagoon by the Mitsubishi company and the Mexican government.  What is being done to stop them from doing so?

Also, How has the drilling of oil in the Beaufort and Bering seas affected Bowhead whale migration routes?  Is there still a strict quota enforced regarding their killing?  They are by far my favourite whale species.

Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
David Sparacino

There is nothing definite regarding the situation of the San Ignacio Lagoon in Baja California. The issue has certainly been raised by many environmental groups.  This is a developing story, so i would suggest that you subscribe to the two sources that can keep you up to date with news: one is marmam (subscribe at marmamed@uvic.ca).  The other is to subscribe to cetacean-news (you can do at majordomo@orcas.net).

Regarding the problem of the effects of noise from drilling platforms in Alaskan waters on bowhead migrations, we know very little at this point.  Acoustic studies have been conducted to analyze these sounds, but there little information about its effects and/or adaptations of marine mammals.  the few relevant data on sound masking have come  large from studies of high-frequency echolocation by toothed whales.

Yes, there are quotas for "scientific" and aboriginal whaling which is still as source of controversy because many dispute that neither type of whaling really served the intended purposes (scientific research an cultural preservation). Yet some countries still practice whaling and some flagless, "pirate" ships have also been reported as being involved in whaling.

Best wishes,




Aldemaro Romero, Ph.D.
Director and Associate Professor
Environmental Studies Program
Macalester College
1600 Grand Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55105-1899
(651) 696-8157
(651) 696-6443 (fax)
romero@macalester.edu

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