Subject: Re: please help me on my report!!!

Bob Cooper (bcoop@neaq.org)
Sun, 28 Feb 1999 02:33:05 -0500

Hello Rosanna,
>
>I WOULD LIKE TO ASK SOME QUESTION THAT IS RELATED TO BLUE WHALES..I'M
>IN 6TH GRADE AND I'M DOING A REPORT ON BLUE WHALES..PLEASE GIVE ME
>GOOD INFORMATION ON BLUE WHALE..
>
>1.WHERE DO BLUE WHALES COME FROM?

Blue Whales live in all the major oceans.

>2. WHAT ARE THEIR EATING HABITS?

They are gulpers! Baleen whales tend to feed in two basic manners: skimmers
and gulpers. Blue whales are gulpers: they'll swim onto their sides, open
their mouth and throat wide, and gulp a huge amount of water and krill.
Next they'll close their mouth and contract their throat muscles pushing
the water out between the baleen plates. The baleen holds the krill in the
whales mouth. Next the whales toungue scrapes the krill off the surface of
the baleen and pushes down in to the gullet...yum.

>3.HOW BIG ARE THEY?

24.0 - 28 meters (78 - 91 ft)

>4. HOW MUCH DO THEY WEIGHT?

approx. 150 tonnes

>5.WHAT EVENT DO THEY DO MOST OF THEIR TIME?

I think that they spend most of their time swimming, searching for food,
eating,  moving from one place to another.

>6.WHAT DO THEY EAT AND WHY?

Krill. Probably because krill is found high concentrations and that makes
it easier to get a lot in one bite.

>7. CAN THEY HAVE BABIES?IF SO HOW MUCH CAN THEY HAVE?

Yes they can start having calves at about age 5. They can bear one calf
every 2-3 years.

>8. CAN THEY LIVE WITHOUT WATER FOR AN HOUR?

Whales, like blue whales, need to stay in the water. Their skeleton has
developed in such a way that the water surrounding them helps support their
great weight. Should it come up onto shore it would not do well. This would
be called a stranding. Whales, like blue whales, usually do not survive a
stranding.

You can get more information from  WhaleNet at:
http://whale.wheelock.edu/whalenet-stuff/classification.html and
http://whale.wheelock.edu/whalenet-stuff/ed_resources.html#biblio

Sources:
the Natural History of Whales & Dolphins, by Peter Evans
Marine Mammals, ed. Delphine Haley

Good luck,
Bob Cooper