Subject: Questions from my Animal Behavior class

NAMMACETA@aol.com
Wed, 22 Sep 1999 20:41:05 EDT

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From: NAMMACETA@aol.com
Full-name: NAMMACETA
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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 20:39:42 EDT
Subject: Questions from my Animal Behavior class
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Hello:

Whales are not necessarily affected by the storm waves.  The ocean is their 
habitat, and they are well adapted to it.  Turtles and seals may be beached 
or injured on the beach by large, sustained waves.  Some animals, like harbor 
seals that are common on the New England coast may become exhausted after a 
sustained bout of heavy seas and become beached or be injured by waves in 
coastal areas.  Deep water animals would not be as vulnerable to the action 
of the seas.  The small fish and other food will not be killed by storms.  
Storms may temporarily alter current patterns and the effects of tides, 
altering the distribution and location of food.  Whales and other predators 
simply alter their locations in response.
Animals may, and most likely do, know when terrific storms are coming.  They 
would not evacuate an area, because the ocean is their area and these storms 
are enormous.  As mentioned above, coastal animals may be adversely effected 
by high surf conditions.  Deep water, offshore animals are probably not 
effected by these conditions, and the "rough" seas die down after 24-48 hours 
anyway.  Most big seas offshore are in the form of large swells anyway.  The 
depth that big waves have an effect to is proportional to their height.

Good questions.

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