Subject: Re: Biology

Phil Clapham (phillip.clapham@noaa.gov)
Mon, 04 Oct 1999 07:06:52 -0400

Hi Patrick:

It depends on what your focus is likely to be.  Basically, people who
love the ocean and find it fascinating can go into science or they can
work in conservation-related areas (which is more management or
policy).  There is a lot of overlap between the two; policy, law and
conservation relating to the ocean and the creatures in it are all
underpinned by scientific research, an many people have feet in both
camps (though one foot is usually much more firmly in one of them).

Having a good science background is very helpful for working in
conservation.  Basically, the ways to get this are: study hard, take a
relevant major, go on to grad school, and get as much practical
experience as you can even if it means volunteering a lot of the time. 
And read widely - not just popular literature, but the primary
scientific papers in journals.

Whalenet has a great resources page for this sort of thing.  Check it
out at: http://whale.wheelock.edu/whalenet-stuff/ed_resources.html

Good luck!

Phil Clapham

> Patrick Burns wrote:
> 
> Hi,
> I AM EXTREMLY INTERESTED IN THE OCEAN WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE A
> PERSON INTERESTED IN SAVING THE OCEAN AND CONSIDERING BEING AN
> OCEANOGRAPHER?  pLEASE E-MAIL ME AT mailto:SAILORDUDE1@GO.COM

-- 

Phillip J. Clapham, Ph.D.
Large Whale Biology Program
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
166 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543

tel (508) 495-2316
fax (508) 495-2066
Internet: phillip.clapham@noaa.gov