Subject: Re: Humpback whale migration routes.

Greg Early (gearly@neaq.org)
Tue, 09 Nov 1999 09:21:58 -0500

Tim,


That is quite a long list... and as you seem to be finding out, locating
data is one of the largest (and most time consuming) tasks in putting
together a GIS project.  There are quite a few metadata resources that
might help your search,however ESRI and other GIS services oftern have data
search tools that can help and are easier to use.  Below are a couple of
starting points, including ESRI's own data searching engine.

http://gis.esri.com/datahound/main.cfm

http://www.utexas.edu/depts/grg/virtdept/resources/data/data.htm#LULC

http://www.ConservationGIS.com./

Much of the general information (SST, productivity, human populations,
should be quite easy to locate and available for free.

A not free source (the advantage is the data is in Arc format) can be
obtained from Rutgers University Center for remote Sensing and Spatial
Analysis.  The produce a data cd with about 150 data layers, including some
oceanic data.  You should contact them at...
global-sales@ocean.rutgers.edu... for the details of what they have
available and find out the current price for the data.

I do not know how much compiled information on migratory routs is out there
(of course you could always construct your own using some of whale nets
data), but a quick search came up with a project on humpbacks and shipping
(although it is done in GRASS).

http://www.cecer.army.mil/ll/WWWDEMO/global_apps/blurb2.html

good luck,

ge



At 10:21 AM 11/04/99 GMT, you wrote:
>Hello,
>          My name is Timothy Barratt, I am a third year student studying 
>Environmental Biology at Plymouth University, England. For my thesis project 
>I am plotting humpback whale migration routes using Arc View which is a GIS 
>application. To do this I will require an awful lot of data that could be 
>used to plot the seasonal movements of these animals around the globe. I 
>will also be incorporating a lot of other data such as ocean currents, prey 
>availability (herring and krill), surface temperatures, major shipping lanes 
>(prop damage), fishing areas (entanglement), and high density tourist areas. 
>So far I have had very little response from the scientific community and 
>very little data has been forth coming. I would be very grateful if you 
>would be prepared to help me find this data or advise me as to where I could 
>possibly find the data I require. Thank you for your time, I hope to hear 
>from you soon, yours faithfully, Tim Barratt.
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
Greg Early
Edgerton Research Laboratory				
New England Aquarium
Central Wharf
Boston, Mass 02110
617-973-5246 (phone)
617-723-6207 (FAX)		
gearly@neaq.org