Seabits 4.7 (fwd)

From: mike williamson (williams@www1.wheelock.edu)
Date: Thu Jun 29 2000 - 22:17:53 EDT


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2000 17:00:35 -0400
From: Jen Goebel <jgoebel@neaq.org>
To: Seabits <seabits@neaq.org>
Subject: Seabits 4.7

S E A B I T S
New England Aquarium Monthly e-mail Newsletter
<http://www.neaq.org/>
Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2000
Copyright, New England Aquarium 2000
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
We are happy to announce our first-ever births of two little blue penguin
chicks this month! Still behind the scenes, you can see pictures of them on our
website. Also this month, it seems New England Aquarium scientists are taking
off for the far corners of the earth: four brave adventurers are off to catalog
the mysteries of a pristine sea in the South Pacific and two penguin experts
are off to South Africa to help de-oil penguins caught in the latest disastrous
oil spill. If you are not taking off for exotic locales, there's still lots to
do here in Boston with whale watches, Tall Ships cruises, exhibit tours and
family field trips. Also, it's your last chance to wow us with your brilliance
and creativity by submitting names for our three new pythons in our Constrictor
Contest (details below).

In this issue:
  Watery Words
  Stories
  - The Perfect Ocean
  - Lobsters in Double Jeopardy
  - Little Blue Bundles of Joy
  - Aquarists Off to Help Oily Birds
  Out on the Net
  Announcements
  - Constrictor Contest
  - New England Aquarium Exploration Center in Newport Is Open
  - Tall Ships Are Coming
  July Calendar
  Subscribe/Unsubscribe
  Contact Us

***** WATERY WORDS ******************************************

     "Early on the morning of February seventh, the watch officer glanced
      to stern and saw a freak wave rising up behind him that lined up
      perfectly with a crow's nest above and behind the bridge. Simple
      geometry later showed the wave to be 112 feet high."

                -- Sebastian Junger, The Perfect Storm, on the biggest
                   rogue wave on record.

***** STORIES *****************************************************
This month's stories
  1) The Perfect Ocean?
  2) Lobsters in Double Jeopardy
  3) Little Blue Bundles of Joy
  4) Aquarists Off to Help Oily Birds

----- THE PERFECT OCEAN? ------------------------------------------------------
By Sue Knapp, Roving Reporter

Four New England Aquarium scientists are spending three weeks diving in the
waters off the Phoenix Islands in the South Pacific investigating what an
"untouched" ocean looks like, or at least a part of the ocean that people
haven't disturbed for the past 50 years or so. The Phoenix Islands are about a
thousand miles east of Fiji. This summer's expedition is part of the Aquarium's
Primal Ocean Project, a global effort to document ecologically healthy regions
of the ocean that resemble pre-human, or pre-exploitation, conditions. It's a
rough job, but someone has to do it.

A team led by Dr. Greg Stone, the Aquarium's Conservation Director, boarded the
120-foot steel motor sailer Nai'a for a five-day crossing to the research area
from Fiji on June 22. Ship-to-satellite communication let us know that they
arrived safely. The team of curators and scientists, Austen Yoshinaga (marine
algae), Steve Bailey (tropical fishes), David Obura (coral reefs) and Greg
(marine mammals), are now surveying and censusing the surrounding reefs. With
help from Cat Holloway, Nai'a Diving Instructor, and Rob Barrel, Nai'a Cruise
Director, the team will identify and quantify the marine life of the region.
Then they will compare that data to other marine environments to assess the
impacts of human activity and to better understand the condition of an
undisturbed ocean. The results of Greg's marine mammal survey will be presented
to the International Whaling Commission to help inform their debate on
establishing a marine mammal sanctuary in the South Pacific.

At one time, people from neighboring, over-populated islands tried to colonize
the Phoenix Islands, but fresh water was difficult to come by. By the 1960s the
settlement was entirely abandoned. With nobody to fish the reefs, they are
wild, possibly brimming, and ripe for an organized, comprehensive survey of the
fish, corals, algae and marine mammals in the region.

By examining near-pristine and robust ecosystems, scientists will better be
able to identify goals for rebuilding the oceans. "Human activities, such as
fishing and coastal development have drastically altered most marine
environments throughout the world. There are now so many people on the planet
that we need to explore those few remaining areas that are uninhabited to
understand the true nature of the ocean," said Greg before he left. "I'm
excited about the mystery of this adventure. It's thrilling to be the first
marine survey team in the region."

Collaborators on this cruise include Nai'a Cruises of Fiji, the Pew Marine
Fellows Program, National Geographic Society and a variety of private funders.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: The Phoenix Islands have the dubious distinction of being the possible
site of Amelia Earhart's plane crash in 1937. If our intrepid adventurers find
Amelia Earhart's plane, we'll let you know.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- LOBSTERS IN DOUBLE JEOPARDY --------------------------------------------
It's summer time, and that means it's time to take a nutcracker in hand, put on
a silly bib and grapple with the tasty crustaceans that inhabit our waters.

New Englanders have been commercially fishing lobsters for more than 170 years.
It's a tradition, and more than that, it's a multimillion dollar industry. As
far as fisheries go, lobster is one of the best managed resources in the
northeast United States. Lobstermen have long supported conservation practices
such as protecting small and super-large lobsters with minimum and maximum size
limits, banning the landing of egg-bearing females, regulating the numbers of
traps fishermen can fish (in some states) and requiring large vent sizes so
that smaller animals can escape the traps. There is some debate among
lobstermen and fishery scientists about whether the fishery is "overfished" or
not. Despite several years of dire warnings about the collapse of lobster
stocks, the lobster industry is still going strong. Well, mostly.

This year, lobsters in Long Island Sound are in trouble. Bet you didn't know
they had lobsters in Long Island Sound. You rarely (if ever) see signs
boasting, "Get your live New York lobsters here!" And yet, lobster fishing is
New York's top-earning fishing business.

When you think of lobsters, you think of Maine, and then maybe Massachusetts
and Rhode Island. And that's about right - Maine harvests about 50% of the
total lobster catch, Massachusetts about 25% and Rhode Island about 11%. New
York and Connecticut, in comparison, bring in small amounts of lobster, but
operated a $42 million industry in 1998 nevertheless. In 1999-2000, it's been
more of a zero dollar industry.

At first people blamed New York City's old and overflowing sewage treatment
plants when 60-99% of the market-sized lobsters showed up in lobster traps
dead. Then, the disaster spread to the eastern end of the Sound. The situation
was so bad that, in January 2000, the Secretary of Commerce declared the Long
Island Sound lobster fishery a disaster. But, the bill that would have made
lobstermen eligible for federal disaster relief died in the House in late
spring.

There appear to be two culprits. And, surprisingly, neither is pollution,
though scientists suspect that the less-than-pristine waters don't make it easy
for the lobsters to fight off the diseases. In the western part of the Sound, a
paramoeba (similar to the amoeba you studied in high school bio) is blamed for
"limp lobster syndrome." The paramoeba invades a lobster's nervous system and
attacks the gland that helps them form and re-form their protective shells. The
invader makes the lobsters turn pink, clouds their eyes, robs them of energy
and inhibits the ability of their blood to coagulate. The lobsters look okay
from the outside, but are just lethargic. Death follows in about 24 hours. So
far, scientists don't have an answer for why these usually robust animals are
succumbing to this parasite.

In the eastern end of the Sound, the troubles are compounded by an outbreak of
shell disease. Shell disease is a more common bacterial infection that erodes a
lobster's shell, deposits a nasty-looking black crust on the shell and
eventually causes death. Infected lobsters look pretty bad from the outside.
Shell disease is not a new phenomenon, but an outbreak this large is a first.

There may be other bacterial diseases contributing to the lobster die-off, and
it may be exacerbated by warmer water, changes in habitat caused by dredging or
dumping and contaminants in the Sound. Die-offs are becoming more common. Right
now, blue crabs, spider crabs and sea urchins along the eastern seaboard are
also experiencing mysterious die-offs, and we have a lot of sick oysters.

Not a pretty picture. But, this shouldn't stop you from enjoying your summer
lobsters - the lobsters that reach your table are inspected before they get
there, and those that make it to market are healthy and alive. Rather than give
up on this summer treat, you can help by supporting local clean-up efforts and
being conscientious about what kind of pollutants roll off your lawn into a
lobster's living room.

At the Aquarium, our Lobster Rearing and Research Facility is working on
breeding and rearing robust lobsters that could be released into troubled
areas, such as Long Island Sound, to sustain this much-needed and much-loved
resource.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: In colonial times, lobsters were a poor person's food. They were
served to children, prisoners and indentured servants. In Massachusetts, some
of the servants rebelled and had it put into their contracts that they could
not be forced to eat lobster more than three times a week.
(From the Gulf of Maine Aquarium website:
<http://octopus.gma.org/lobsters/allaboutlobsters/lobsterhistory.html/>)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- LITTLE BLUE BUNDLES OF JOY ----------------------------------------------
On May 20 and 25, our "Easter eggs" hatched! The proud parents, Tasmania and
Melbourne, Gur-roo-mal and Philip, are four of our colony of nine little blue
penguins (Eudyptula minor) from Australia and New Zealand. Little blues, the
smallest penguins in the world, weigh in at about two pounds when fully grown
and sport bluish-gray feathers, hence their name.

The chicks, two little blackish-gray balls of downy fluff, are doing well in
their special habitat behind the scenes. The older chick was raised by its
parents for its first 29 days, and at 37 days old, weighed in at 1130 grams.
The younger chick was removed from its parents at five days old because it was
losing weight, and at 32 days old, weighed in at 660 grams. Although our
aquarists are doing a great job raising the chicks, it's clear that they are no
match for penguin parents that know what they are doing.

As newly hatched chicks, penguin babies need to eat 10 percent of their body
weight about every two hours. We feed chicks a special fish-shake of blended
herring filets, shrimp, water and vitamins. Aquarists use a syringe with a
pastry-type tip on the end to squirt the pancake batter-like formula into the
baby's mouth when it shows the proper feeding response. It's important that the
chick show this behavior so that aquarists know that its trachea is closed off,
and they can squirt with relative assurance that the food is going in the right
place. The older chick is now on a completely solid food diet, but the younger
one still gets 30 cc's of formula a day. In the morning, aquarists weigh each
chick. The chick's weight determines how much food it gets - the chicks are now
down to four feedings a day, still receiving 10 percent of their body weight
each time.

Feeding a baby is tough on the parents - it's a round-the-clock job, as any
parent of a newborn human knows. In the wild, there is a natural weaning point
when the penguin parents return to sea to fatten up for molting. In captivity,
that doesn't happen, so aquarists remove the chicks from their parents slightly
before weaning for two reasons: first, to give the parents the break they would
get in the wild, and second, to accustom the chick to being hand-fed as it will
be when it joins the exhibit.

When their feathers have grown in and aquarists feel they are ready, these two
little ones will join our colony. Already, aquarist Heather Urquhart says they
can feel little bumps that are the beginnings of quills for adult waterproof
feathers on the larger one. Look for them on exhibit sometime in the fall.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: All of our original little blues were born at the Melbourne Zoo,
offspring of parents that had been rescued as sick or injured birds from the
wild and were deemed unlikely to survive in the wild on their own. In the wild,
their population is considered to be stable or decreasing, with one subspecies
considered endangered.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- AQUARISTS OFF TO HELP OILY BIRDS --------------------------------------
On June 23, the oil tanker Treasure spilled 1,300 tons of fuel oil as it sank
six miles off of the coast of Cape Town, South Africa. Robben Island, home to
more than 20,000 African penguins, is directly in the path of the spill.
SANCCOB (South African National Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal
Birds) is airlifting birds off the island with help from the South African
Airforce. Unoiled birds are being deposited several miles north of the spill,
out of harm's way, and the rest are undergoing rigorous de-oiling. In previous
spills, about half of the oiled birds survived. Not good news for a population
the World Conservation Union calls "vulnerable to extinction."

Because this disaster hit right in the middle of breeding season, the lives of
about 6,000 penguin chicks are also at stake. New England Aquarium penguin
experts Heather Urquhart and Dyan deNapoli are heading off to Cape Town on
Friday, June 30, where they will help de-oil the birds and care for the chicks.
Their expertise in raising nearly 40 African penguin chicks here at the
Aquarium will come in handy.

Watch our website <http://www.neaq.org/> for updates from Heather and Dyan in
Africa. And, look for complete details of their expedition in the next Seabits.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: The New England Aquarium's involvement in this recovery effort is made
possible through the Aquarium's Conservation Action Fund (CAF). To help out,
you can make donations to CAF by calling Angela Ellis at (617) 973-5209 or
e-mailing her at <aellis@neaq.org> for more information, or by adopting a
penguin through SANCCOB at <http://www.uct.ac.za/depts/stats/adu/oilspill/>.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***** OUT ON THE NET *********************************************
For additional information, you might want to check out the following
websites. Some of these links represent partners in aquatic conservation
and animal husbandry; others are simply resources we think may help you
enrich your perspective on our watery world. By listing these websites, the
New England Aquarium is not automatically endorsing or verifying the
accuracy of their content unless explicitly stated.

Primal Ocean Project
<http://www.kidsplanet.com/ce5/CE040734.html/>
<http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Phoenixmap.html/>
<http://www.tighar.org/Projects/AEdescr.html/>

Lobsters
<http://octopus.gma.org/lobsters/allaboutlobsters/lobsterhistory.html/>
<http://www.lobster.um.maine.edu/lobster/>
<http://www.crewdog.net/lobsterpage/>
<http://www.lobsters.org/>

Little Blue Penguin Chicks
Photos: <http://www.neaq.org/special/littleguy/>
<http://expage.com/page/fairypenguin>
<http://www.pakcenter.com/reading/education/zoo/birds/LittleBluePenguin.html/>
<http://home.capu.net/~kwelch/pp/species/little.html/>

African Penguins and June Oil Spill
<http://www.neaq.org/special/oilspill/index.html/>
<http://www.uct.ac.za/depts/stats/adu/oilspill/>
<http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environ/20000626/t000060454.html/>

***** Announcements *****************************************
This month's announcements
  1) Constrictor Contest
  2) New England Aquarium Exploration Center in Newport is Open
  3) Tall Ships Are Coming

----- CONSTRICTOR CONTEST ----------------------------------------------------
Last chance to name those pythons! Our three new residents, African rock
pythons, are, sadly, nameless at the moment. They are a male (8 feet) and 2
females (12 and 14 feet). To enter the contest, send your suggestions for names
to me, Jen Goebel, Seabits Editor, at <jgoebel@neaq.org>. Preference will be
given to a trio of names, but names for individual snakes will also be accepted
- however, the first person to suggest "Monty" gets lashed with a wet noodle.
This contest is open to Seabits readers, New England Aquarium members and
visitors, but not to New England Aquarium staff, interns, volunteers or former
webmasters. Closing date for entries is July 1.

We will announce a winner in the August issue. The winner can choose between
these prizes: a large plush python thanks to our gift shop (which also has lots
of other cool plush Nyanja animals, by the way, including tarantulas, crocs and
chameleons) or a wonderful whale watch for two out to Stellwagen Bank to see
the great whales in their natural habitat. The runner-up will receive the other
prize. Questions? E-mail me. Thanks to all of you who submitted entries. I'll
keep you posted on how things go.

----- NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM EXPLORATION CENTER IN NEWPORT IS OPEN -------------
The New England Aquarium opened our "branch office" in Newport, Rhode Island
over Memorial Day weekend. Just steps away from the inviting sand and sparkling
water of Easton's Beach, the lower level of the Easton's Beach rotunda is now
crawling with, well, crawling things - tube-footed sea stars, gregarious hermit
crabs, shy clams, tiny periwinkles and more. In addition to hands-on
exploration of tidepool creatures, the Exploration Center offers a series of
exhibits on marine animals and habitats, focusing mostly on animals that live
in Narragansett Bay.

In cooperation with Save the Bay and University of Rhode Island Sea Grant, the
Newport Exploration Center offers guided walks on the beach, lots of
conservation-related activities for kids, a lecture series (see
<http://www.neaq.org/special/newport/index.html> for offerings), and a wealth
of information on the local habitat. The Exploration Center provides a place
for kids to learn about the importance of the environment they enjoy and how to
protect the beaches and nearby Narragansett Bay. Our goal in opening up this
beachfront aquarium is to teach kids about the nature they are enjoying and
raise their awareness of the natural world while they are in it! For more
information, visit our website or call Bonnie Epstein at (401) 849-8430.

----- TALL SHIPS ARE COMING -------------------------------------------------
What are the Tall Ships, why are they coming, and why should you make your way
down to the waterfront between July 11 and 21? Here's the scoop:

For the uninitiated, tall ships are sailing vessels with at least two masts.
Remember the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria? Tall ships, every one. And
there are lots more all over the world, filled with captains and crews, still
sailing the seas.

Tall Ships 2000 is, as the name suggests, a millennial celebration of sailing.
In April, a large flotilla of tall ships and other sailboats set off on a
4-month journey to circumnavigate the Atlantic Ocean. There are several races
throughout the tour, including two Atlantic crossings and a race from Boston to
Halifax, Nova Scotia. From there, they will race to Amsterdam for the final
leg.

Boston will host the Tall Ships at the end of their "Cruise in Company," a more
leisurely ride up the eastern seaboard of the United States from the Bahamas.
We are expecting about 120 vessels in Boston. Some of the boats hail from as
far away as Japan, the Greek Islands and Indonesia.

During Sail Boston 2000 (our part of the event), you can board all the ships
for free. Boarding times for each boat will be posted at its entrance. The
boats will be docked at various locations around Boston, including the wharfs
along Atlantic Avenue, East Boston, Waterfront Park and the Charlestown Navy
Yard. There will also be fireworks at 10 p.m. on July 11 and 15.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Today, 97% of the world's exports are still carried by sea.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New England Aquarium offers the following cruises to see the Tall Ships on the
water, in their glory:

Tuesday, July 11 - PARADE OF SAILS, 7:30 a.m -4:30 p.m.
Voyager III $175 per person, includes DJ/buffet
Voyager II $150 per person, includes music/food
Doc Edgerton $100 per person, includes box lunch

Wednesday July 12 - Saturday, July 15 - DAILY HARBOR CRUISES
Join us aboard the Voyager III or Doc Edgerton to get a closer look at the Tall
Ships. For schedule and pricing information, please call (617) 973-5281 or
visit <http://www.neaq.org/special/tallships/index.html/>.

Sunday, July 16 - DEPARTING PARADE, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Join us for the departing parade and a last glimpse of the Tall Ships.$50 per
person. (Note: both New England Aquarium Members' Cruises are sold out.)

***** JULY CALENDAR ******************************************
Saturday, July 1, Seals in the Sea Preschool Explorers Class, 9:30 a.m.
Recommended for ages 3 to 5. This program combines a story, a hands-on
activity, and a take-home art project or closer look at live animals. Call
(617) 973-5206 for fees, reservations and information.

Sunday, July 2, Exploring the Giant Ocean Tank Guided Tour, 9:15 a.m.
Dip into the lives of the inhabitants of the Aquarium centerpiece, the Giant
Ocean Tank. See how the habitat and species change as you delve deeper in the
Caribbean coral reef. With the lead of an Aquarium educator, you'll see animals
you may not have seen before. Call (617) 973-5206 for fees, reservations and
information.

Sunday, July 2, Seals in the Sea Preschool Explorers Class, 9:30 a.m.
Recommended for ages 3 to 5. This program combines a story, a hands-on
activity, and a take-home art project or closer look at live animals. Call
(617) 973-5206 for fees, reservations and information.

Saturday, July 8, Fierce Fishes Guided Tour, 9:15 a.m.
Piranhas and eels and sharks, oh my! There are many ferocious fish living at
New England Aquarium. Or are there? Come tour through the galleries and get the
real scoop on these and other "dangerous animals." Guided exhibit tours are a
unique opportunity to see the Aquarium's hidden treasures. Call (617) 973-5206
for fees, reservations and information.

Saturday, July 8, Winthrop Family Field Trip, 10 a.m.
Spend a few hours with Aquarium educators in Yerrill Beach exploring habitats
and raising your awareness about environmental issues in this area. Learn how
to identify aquatic or marine life and see how animals have adapted to live in
their watery world. Recommended for ages 5 and up. Call (617) 973-5206 for
fees, reservations and information.

Saturday, July 15, Seals in the Sea Preschool Explorers Class, 9:30 a.m.
Recommended for ages 3 to 5. This program combines a story, a hands-on
activity, and a take-home art project or closer look at live animals. Call
(617) 973-5206 for fees, reservations and information.

Saturday, July 15, Brookline Family Field Trip, 10 a.m.
Spend a few hours with Aquarium educators at Ward's Pond exploring habitats and
raising your awareness about environmental issues in this area. Learn how to
identify aquatic or marine life and see how animals have adapted to live in
their watery world. Recommended for ages 5 and up. Call (617) 973-5206 for
fees, reservations and information.

Sunday, July 16, Seals in the Sea Preschool Explorers Class, 9:30 a.m.
Recommended for ages 3 to 5. This program combines a story, a hands-on
activity, and a take-home art project or closer look at live animals. Call
(617) 973-5206 for fees, reservations and information.

Wednesday, July 19, Dive Club Meeting, 6:30 p.m.
Dive Club meeting at New England Aquarium. Guests and new members always
welcome. Call (617) 973-0240 for details or visit our website at
<http://www.neadc.org>. Meeting Location: Conference Center.

Thursday, July 20, Can I Switch? Workshop, 6:15-7:30 p.m.
Thinking about switching to a career in the environment? Find out how to break
into the environmental field and how to create a resume and interviewing
strategy that highlights your transferable skills. The first workshop in a
series of three; others to be held July 27 and August 3. Call (617) 973-5206
for fees, reservations and information.

Saturday, July 22, Hingham Family Field Trip, 10 a.m.
Spend a few hours with Aquarium educators in Webb State Park exploring habitats
and raising your awareness about environmental issues in this area. Learn how
to identify aquatic or marine life and see how animals have adapted to live in
their watery world. Recommended for ages 5 and up. Call (617) 973-5206 for
fees, reservations and information.

Thursday, July 27, Can I Switch? Workshop, 6:15-7:30 p.m.
Thinking about switching to a career in the environment? Find out how to break
into the environmental field and how to create a resume and interviewing
strategy that highlights your transferable skills. The second workshop in a
series of three; final session on August 3. Call (617) 973-5206 for fees,
reservations and information.

***** SUBSCRIBE/UNSUBSCRIBE INFORMATION **********************
To subscribe to Seabits, either visit <http://www.neaq.org/beyond/seabits/>
OR send e-mail to <macjordomo@neaq.org>. In the body of your e-mail message
write "subscribe seabits" (without the quotes).

To unsubscribe to Seabits, send e-mail to <macjordomo@neaq.org>. In the body
of your e-mail message write "unsubscribe seabits" (without the quotes).

***** CONTACT US ****************************************
Questions and comments? Contact Jennifer Goebel at
<jgoebel@neaq.org>.

***** THAT'S ALL FOLKS ************************************
If any of you missed the sea lions, you'll be happy to know that they, and
their home, the Discovery, are back!
- Jen Goebel, Editor

Jennifer S. Goebel, Publications Coordinator/Senior Publicist
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110-3399
Phone: (617) 973-5222; Fax: (617) 723-9705; email: jgoebel@neaq.org
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Jennifer S. Goebel, Publications Coordinator/Senior Publicist
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110-3399
Phone: (617) 973-5222; Fax: (617) 723-9705; email: jgoebel@neaq.org
<'))))>< <'))))>< <'))))>< <'))))>< <'))))>< <'))))><



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