Subject: Baby seal lost in North Caroli (fwd)

Michael Williamson (pita@whale.simmons.edu)
Tue, 4 Feb 1997 11:06:37 -0500 (EST)

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J. Michael Williamson
   Principal Investigator-WhaleNet <http://whale.wheelock.edu>
   Associate Professor-Science
   Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215
voice: 617.734.5200, ext. 256
fax:    617.734.8666, or 617.566.7369
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---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sun,  2 Feb 97 03:51:00 GMT 
From: r.mallon1@genie.com
To: marmam@uvvm.uvic.ca, pita@whale.simmons.edu
Subject: Baby seal lost in North Caroli

Baby seal lost in North Carolina

  MANTEO, N.C., Jan. 30 (UPI S) -- Veterinarians at the North Carolina
State Aquarium say a baby seal found on a beach near the Virginia state
line is doing well and they expect to be able to release him into the
wild soon.
   Officials say the seal appears to be in good health, but is so young
the weaning process is not yet complete and he will not be released
until he can eat on his own.
   Frank Hudgins, curator at the aquarium, said today (Thursday) the 47-
pound male seal, who has not been named, is being force fed with a
souplike mixture of ground fish.
   He said, "Hopefully, it will get tired of being force fed and start
eating on its own. I would hope it would be a matter of a few days
before it is released."
   The seal was discovered on Corolla Beach on North Carolina's outer
banks near the state line late Sunday.
   Hudgins said it is not unusual to find a seal that far south on the
Atlantic Coast, and aquarium veterinarians and others deal with about
four or five a year.
   He said, "Usually when we have a seal incident it is injured, but this
one is not injured at all. It was probably just lost."
   Steve Busack of the North Carolina State Museum in Raleigh, N.C., said
there was the possibility the seal was being transported and escaped or
that someone had bought the seal had released it.
   He said seals are well equipped to defend themselves from predators,
including dogs.