Subject: Manatee:Florida manatee freed from sto (fwd)

Mike Williamson (pita@www1.wheelock.edu)
Mon, 17 Nov 1997 13:58:08 -0500 (EST)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 97 14:46:00 GMT 
From: r.mallon1@genie.com
To: marmam@uvvm.uvic.ca, pita@whale.simmons.edu
Subject: Florida manatee freed from sto

Florida manatee freed from storm water pipe

    COCOA BEACH, Fla. (Reuters) - A young manatee has been
rescued from a Florida storm sewer pipe in which it had been
trapped for more than a week, a Sea World spokeswoman said on
Friday.
     The 435-pound manatee was in a stable condition at Sea World
marine park in Orlando and was expected to make a full recovery,
spokeswoman Kjerstin Ecker told Reuters.
     Ecker said the Banana River manatee became trapped when it
swam into the storm drain in search of fresh water. It was
unable to turn around and get out as the water level dropped.
     "She's doing great. They're supplementing her with
additional fluids," Ecker said.
     "She could not get out and had nothing to eat. She
literally had sulfur deposits on her face. I would assume she
was in there anywhere from a week to a month," Department of
Environmental Protection biologist Ann Spellman told the St
Petersburg Times newspaper.
     Spellman said the manatee was lucky to be alive asmost
manatees discovered in storm pipes were dead.
     Department workers saw her while replacing a grate. Eight
rescue workers climbed through the spider-filled pipe and put
the manatee on a stretcher.
     Ecker said the manatee was still dehydrated and it would not
be known until next week when the endangered marine mammal could
be returned to the wild.
     Manatees, or sea cows, are gentle, slow-moving vegetarian
giants which can weigh over 1,000 pounds. They are among the
most endangered of marine mammals, with only 2,500-3,000
remaining in warm U.S. coastal waters.
     More than 400 manatees died last year, the worst mortality
record of any year on record. About 150 of those were killed by
brevetoxin, a substance produced by red tide, a massive algae
bloom.