Subject: Orca: "wolf of the sea" (fwd)

Mike Williamson (pita@www1.wheelock.edu)
Mon, 20 Apr 1998 10:50:58 -0400 (EDT)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      J. Michael Williamson
Principal Investigator-WhaleNet <http://whale.wheelock.edu>
                   Associate Professor-Science
  Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215
             voice: 617.734.5200, ext. 256
            fax:    617.734.8666, or 978.468.0073

          "Mother, Mother Ocean, I have heard your call,
   Wanted to sail upon your waters, since I was three feet tall"
                        Jimmy Buffett
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---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 1998 17:42:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Cara M. Gubbins" <cara@scs.unr.edu>
To: JCastor715 <JCastor715@aol.com>
Cc: pita@whale.wheelock.edu
Subject: Re: "wolf of the sea"

Jan,
 You're right - the orca (or killer whale) is considered the wolf of the
sea. Orcas and wolves have many similar characteristics: they are both
dominant predators in their ecosystems, have stron social ties and social
systems, and both often hunt cooperatively.
Hope this answers your question,
Cara

On Sat, 18 Apr 1998, JCastor715 wrote:

> As a teacher doing a unit on whales and using the "Voyage of the Mimi" as our
> center of study, we have come across a question that none of the students or
> teachers are able to find an answer on.  The question is:Which whale is called
> the "wolf of the sea"?  Many of us assume it to be the killer whale, but one
> of our students disagrees.  He says it is the sperm, but none of us have been
> able to find a "real" answer.  Thanks for your help on this one.  Jan C.
>