Subject: Dolphin Assisted Therapy (fwd)

Mike Williamson (pita@www1.wheelock.edu)
Tue, 12 Jan 1999 11:00:41 -0500 (EST)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 10:39:36 -0500
From: Lori Marino <lmarino@emory.edu>
Reply-To: Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
     <MARMAM@UVVM.UVIC.CA>
To: MARMAM@UVVM.UVIC.CA
Subject: new critique of Dolphin Assisted Therapy


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Dear Subscribers,

    There have been some exchanges on MARMAM about Dolphin Assisted
Therapy (DAT) fairly recently.  I would like to call your attention to a
paper Scott Lilienfeld and I recently published in the journal
Anthrozoos, which is abstracted below.

Lori Marino, Ph.D.
lmarino@emory.edu

Marino, L. &  Lilienfeld, S. (1998). Dolphin-assisted therapy: flawed
data, flawed conclusions. Anthrozoos, 11(4), 194-200.

    Two reports by Nathanson, Castro, Friend, and McMahon (1997) and
Nathanson (1998) on the short-term and long-term effectiveness of
dolphin-assisted therapy (DAT) for children with severe disabilities
have recently appeared in Anthrozoos. The authors of these reports have
concluded that DAT represents an effective therapeutic intervention for
several disorders, e.g., autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation,
and that DAT achieves positive results more quickly and more cost
effectively than conventional long-term therapy. Nevertheless, a
methodological analysis of these studies demonstrates that these studies
violate several important criteria for methodological soundness and,
thus, scientific validity. This plethora of serious threats to validity
and flawed data analytic procedures render the findings of Nathanson and
colleagues uninterpretable and their conclusions unwarranted and
premature. Practioners of DAT and parents who are considering DAT for
their children should be made aware that this treatment has yet to be
put to an adequate empirical test.



--
Lori Marino, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program
Department of Psychology
532 North Kilgo Circle
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia 30322
(404) 727-7582
Fax: (404) 727-0372


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Dear Subscribers,

    There have been some exchanges on MARMAM about Dolphin Assisted Therapy (DAT) fairly recently.  I would like to call your attention to a paper Scott Lilienfeld and I recently published in the journal Anthrozoos, which is abstracted below.

Lori Marino, Ph.D.
lmarino@emory.edu

Marino, L. &  Lilienfeld, S. (1998). Dolphin-assisted therapy: flawed data, flawed conclusions. Anthrozoos, 11(4), 194-200.

    Two reports by Nathanson, Castro, Friend, and McMahon (1997) and Nathanson (1998) on the short-term and long-term effectiveness of dolphin-assisted therapy (DAT) for children with severe disabilities have recently appeared in Anthrozoos. The authors of these reports have concluded that DAT represents an effective therapeutic intervention for several disorders, e.g., autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation,  and that DAT achieves positive results more quickly and more cost effectively than conventional long-term therapy. Nevertheless, a methodological analysis of these studies demonstrates that these studies violate several important criteria for methodological soundness and, thus, scientific validity. This plethora of serious threats to validity and flawed data analytic procedures render the findings of Nathanson and colleagues uninterpretable and their conclusions unwarranted and premature. Practioners of DAT and parents who are considering DAT for their children should be made aware that this treatment has yet to be put to an adequate empirical test.
 
 

--
Lori Marino, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program
Department of Psychology
532 North Kilgo Circle
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia 30322
(404) 727-7582
Fax: (404) 727-0372
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