Subject: SeaBits, NEAq.

mike williamson (williams@www1.wheelock.edu)
Wed, 31 Mar 1999 21:30:58 -0500 (EST)

Subject: New England Aquarium Seabits 3.4
Sender: <seabits@neaq.org>
Precedence: Bulk

S E A B I T S
New England Aquarium Monthly email Newsletter
<http://www.neaq.org/>
Volume 3, Issue 4, April 1999
Copyright, New England Aquarium 1999
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
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Ah ... Spring at last! This month, we bring you a truly amazing exhibit, the
first of its kind, an auditory adventure called Sounds of the Sea. Opening o=
n
April 17, Sounds of the Sea showcases the actual underwater sounds made by
everything from icebergs (surprisingly melodic) to toadfish (otherworldly
humming) to snapping shrimp (loud little critters). Some of the sounds are
truly incredible, and I know because I've been sitting in the cubicle next
door to sound-testing central for the past few months!

Also this month we bring you news of moray eels that tie themselves in knots=
,
our first rehabilitated puffin and the latest on the white-sided dolphin
stranding. A great Lowell Lecture Series begins in April, as does whale watc=
h
season. Be sure to join us for some fun stuff this month.

In this issue:
  Watery Words
  Stories
    - Sounds of the Sea
    - A Rose is a Rose is a ... Puffin
    - Moray Eels Tie Themselves in Knots
    - White-sided Dolphins Strand on the Cape
  Out on the Net
  Lowell Lecture Series
  April Calendar
  Subscribe/Unsubscribe
  Contact Us

=3D-=3D-=3D WATERY WORDS =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D=
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    "In the 1830s and 1840s, as British and American sea captains
     began to adopt random deep-water sounding as an occasional
     pastime, the public was regaled with a series of reports of
     incredible depths in the Atlantic -- of 50,000 feet of line run
     out, say, with no bottom found. The reports were all quite wrong."

                             -- Robert Kunzig, The Restless Sea

=3D-=3D-=3D STORIES =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=
=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D
This month's stories
  1) Construction Plans Called "Colorful"
  2) Sounds of the Sea
  3) Seals Surprisingly Static
  4) A Rose is a Rose is a ... Puffin
  5) Whale Watches Coming to Boston Harbor
  6) That's a Moray
  7) White-sided Dolphins Strand on Cape Cod
  8) High Priority Mix-up

----- CONSTRUCTION PLANS CALLED "COLORFUL" --------------------------------
In an unprecedented, but highly original move, President Jerry Schubel
announced that the new multi-million Aquarium expansion will be constructed
entirely out of Legos. Citing their modularity, easy availability and
eye-catching primary colors, the Aquarium has placed an initial order with
e-Toys for 15 million Duplo Basic Tub Lego sets (slightly larger than regula=
r
Legos, and not a choking hazard for penguins or small children).

Donations of Legos will be accepted throughout the construction, so if you
have any old Lego sets, please send them to: Lego Construction Initiative, c=
/o
Bruce Wyman, New England Aquarium, Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110.

----- SOUNDS OF THE SEA ---------------------------------------------------
The ocean is not as silent as you might think. In fact, it can be pretty noi=
sy
down there what with the little snapping shrimp making a racket, underwater
earthquakes rumbling, icebergs squeaking and toadfish keeping boaters up at
night with their humming. We humans are also making a lot of noise in the
oceans these days, as we dredge for oil and ship products all over the world
in large container ships.

On April 17, we open a new exhibit called Sounds of the Sea that will take y=
ou
along on a humpback whale's journey from Greenland to the Caribbean. As you
enter each of the three dimly-lit sound galleries, which represent the three
geographic areas the whale travels through, your ears will be treated to a
symphony of sounds. You will hear everything from thunderstorms to crashing
container vessels to dolphin squeaking to grunting fish.

After each gallery, you can stop at sound dictionaries and decipher what you
heard. There are also a number of interactive stations where you can learn
about how fast sound travels underwater (5 times faster than in air!), how
sound gets distorted underwater and how scientists are using sound in the
water to keep track of the earth's temperature. Test your echolocation skill=
s
by searching for hidden flounder using dolphin-like sonar. Learn how
scientists are using sound to create accurate maps of the ocean floor. By
listening to this exhibit, you will gain a new appreciation for the role sou=
nd
plays in the marine environment.

Sounds of the Sea does more than just delight you with amazing sounds; it al=
so
explores the issues of human-generated sounds and how they might affect mari=
ne
animals. As the oceans get busier with human activity, it becomes important =
to
understand the implications to the animals living there and determine if and
how the added noise upsets their lives.

Come join us for an amazing auditory adventure. The Sounds of the Sea exhibi=
t
is located in the Aquarium's Education/Exploration Center at the base of the
Boston Harbor Parking Garage. Sounds of the Sea, developed in collaboration
with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution, is funded by the National Science Foundation and is brought to
you by Bell Atlantic Mobile.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Because fish don't have external ears, people used to think fish we=
re
deaf. We now know that fish can hear and sense noise in the ocean, but our
knowledge is limited to just a few species. Goldfish apparently have very go=
od
hearing over a wide range of frequencies.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- SEALS SURPRISINGLY STATIC -------------------------------------------
A new study by Aquarium researcher Greg Early often referred to as the man
with the iron hair, is stirring up the scientific community. In a recent
article in Nature, Greg reports that harbor seals are surprisingly susceptib=
le
to the forces of static electricity. In an experiment elegant for its
simplicity, Greg discovered that a dry harbor seal rubbed against his hair
stuck to the plexiglas wall of the new outdoor harbor seal exhibit in 73 out
of 82 trials.

The harbor seals, held to the plexiglas by the delicate bonds created by
static electricity, each hung for several minutes before plummeting into the
water with rather surprised looks on their faces. Visitors to the exhibit we=
re
entranced, asking Early over and over to "do it again!" The ten incidences o=
f
"non-stick" seals may be due to the insufficient hair rubbing. Greg plans to
do similar studies on dry ring, harp and possibly even juvenile hooded seals
in the future. Preliminary results show that the entire effect can be revers=
ed
by adding Jerricurl Activator Plus to the pool water.

----- A ROSE IS A ROSE IS A ... PUFFIN ------------------------------------
Rose-rose, so named for the pink bands around each of her ankles, is a wild
puffin who recently joined our puffin exhibit in Coastal Rhythms. Rose is th=
e
first Atlantic puffin successfully rehabilitated by the New England Aquarium=
,
and may even be one of the first Atlantic puffins rehabilitated in the Unite=
d
States. The U.S. puffin population has rebounded from a dramatic low of one
nesting pair in 1908 to about 2000 breeding pairs in 1998, largely thanks to
Project Puffin (started by ornithologist Steven Kress in 1973).

Rose comes to us from Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, where an animal control
officer found her being chased by a dog. Blind in one eye, Rose was also ver=
y
emaciated. Rose's treatment began at the Center for Wildlife in York, Maine,
but she was moved to the New England Aquarium a few days later to take
advantage of our facilities and our experience in caring for seabirds.

Aquarists rigged up a special saltwater quarantine tank for her in our seabi=
rd
rehabilitation facility, also known as the "chicken coop" for its
wood-and-plastic-chicken-wire construction. Upon surveying her new home, Ros=
e
immediately scarfed down the offered silverside fish. She took to the
saltwater and cleaned her feathers, returning them to their waterproof state
in a few days. Within 10 days, she had returned to her normal 400 gram body
weight (up from 280 grams).

Because of her blindness in one eye, Rose is not a candidate for release to
the wild. She joins our seven puffins from Montreal, Canada in the exhibit.
Rose is a mature female, anywhere from 5 to 20 years old. Aquarists are hopi=
ng
that she will hit it off with Yellow Yellow, the mature male of our group. S=
o
far, both males, Yellow Yellow and Blue Yellow, have shown interest in her.
Blue Yellow has offered her a feather, a sign of courtship. So far, Rose is
adjusting well to her surroundings and being part of the group. Aquarists an=
d
veterinarians will be watching her closely to monitor her progress, but are
expecting the transition to continue to be relatively smooth since puffins a=
re
colonial animals.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: When Rose was x-rayed at her initial exam at Tufts University
Veterinary School, the radiologists were lucky to see some enlarged ovaries,
and determined that Rose was female. Seabirds' gonads shrink tremendously at
the end of the breeding season, a process called recrudescence, so it is not
always possible to find a bird's sex organs in an x-ray.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- WHALE WATCHES COMING TO BOSTON HARBOR -------------------------------
Citing the high costs of whale watch vessels and travel time to Stellwagen
Bank, this summer the New England Aquarium will begin the process of
relocating humpback, right, minke and some pilot whales to Boston's inner
harbor. Whales will be brought to the local area with strong incentives such
as free all-you-can-eat fish and krill buffets, comprehensive health and
dental benefits, weekly massages, sign-up bonuses and a chance to participat=
e
in the Aquarium's retirement plan. Whales will have to sign an exclusivity
contract in which they would agree NOT to make appearances on Stellwagen Ban=
k
during the regular whale watch season.

----- THAT'S A MORAY ------------------------------------------------------
by Sue Knapp, roving reporter

Moray eels have long been a tourist attraction for tropical divers and for
visitors to the New England Aquarium. They are often mistaken for vicious
beasts probably because of their menacing stance: standing at attention, wov=
en
into coral reefs, opening and closing their mouths in a threatening manner.
Not to fear, this is simply a way for these relatively shy animals to breath=
e
better, getting more oxygen in from the surrounding water.

According to New England Aquarium Medical Center manager Kristin Dube, they
are totally deserving of the phrase, slippery as an eel. Kristin reports tha=
t,
when treating an eel in our veterinary clinic, it often takes several people
wearing heavy-duty rubber gloves to get a good grip on the patient.

It is a myth that moray eels are aggressive and hunt divers ruthlessly. Dive=
rs
are often cautioned to tread softly around them and not go blindly sticking
their fingers into dark crevices. Most moray eel "attacks" are the result of
the eels protecting their territory or perhaps looking for an easy meal.

Aquarium diver Sherrie Floyd, while diving in the Aquarium's Giant Ocean Tan=
k
exhibit, became a victim of mistaken identity. As the story goes, she was
carrying a bag of shrimp intending to proceed with a routine feeding dive. T=
he
scent of shrimp apparently wafted toward a big green moray eel, and he came
looking for a snack. Apparently, to the eel, Sherrie's finger resembled a
shrimp .... Morays can bite and hold on with long, thin, sharp teeth that
point throat-ward, so Sherrie gave him a good shake to dislodge him. (As a
last resort, some divers have had to break a moray's jaw to separate the eel
from the person.) Since a moray's teeth are covered with a bacterial slime,
rather than poisonous venom as some think, she went right to the hospital fo=
r
antibiotics.

Morays also have the ability to tie themselves into a knot. Someone told me =
it
helps the eel restrain its prey, while another reports that the untying
momentum aids with digestion.

I'm sure many divers out there have their own strange tales of eel
experiences. Send them in =8A we may need some ideas for our Halloween editi=
on
of Seabits.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplets: As a footnote, ever since Sherrie's encounter with the moray, that
particular eel has, to this day, lost his appetite for shrimp. In another ca=
se
of mistaken identity, Aquarium diver Holly Martel Bourbon was bitten by a wi=
ld
moray. In that case, the eel died. No lie.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- WHITE-SIDED DOLPHINS STRAND ON CAPE COD -----------------------------
Early on the morning of Friday, March 19, the New England Aquarium/Fleet Ban=
k
Marine Animal Rescue Team started receiving calls about stranded dolphins in
Wellfleet, Barnstable and Eastham. The team immediately set out for the Cape=
,
and spent the weekend caring for dying white-sided dolphins.

Of the 53 or so animals that stranded, 25 died, 25 were euthanized after a
veterinarian determined that the prognosis was hopeless, and three were tagg=
ed
and released from Provincetown and have not returned to the beach, which is =
a
good sign.

Why did this pelagic (open-ocean) species come to the shallow coastal waters
of Cape Cod, and why did so many die? These are the questions scientists and
veterinarians try to answer whenever a stranding occurs. The fact is that
nobody can say for sure why marine mammals strand, only that they do. One
theory is that the unusually strong tides, the new moon and the high winds m=
ay
have contributed to the dolphins being in shallower water than they were use=
d
to. The tide was also going out very quickly, leaving no room for navigation=
al
errors. When the dolphins were not able to get back into deeper water, they
went into shock and died.

Tissues samples were taken from each of the dead dolphins. Researchers hope =
to
find some clue to what may have caused this stranding, but sampling from las=
t
year's stranding of 97 dolphins did not reveal anything definitive.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: At around the same time, a stranding of 40-50 bottlenose dolphins
took place on Australia's coast, of which only one animal died. According to
head veterinarian Andy Stamper, bottlenose dolphins are a much hardier
species, are easier to handle and are used to coastal environments.
White-sided dolphins seem to go into shock very easily, making them much mor=
e
difficult to treat. The New England Aquarium was the first facility to
successfully rescue, rehabilitate and release white-sided dolphins, having
returned a mother and calf pair to the sea in 1985.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- HIGH PRIORITY MIX-UP ------------------------------------------------
Greg Early, the research scientist in charge of our seal tagging program,
recently discovered that through a mix-up with service ARGOS (the satellite
company of the stars), instead of tracking a hooded seal for the past six
months, he had actually been tracking a wayward FEDEX package.  The package,
(size nine red women's pumps) were ordered through the Home Shopping Network
and were scheduled to be delivered to Atlanta, Georgia.  So far Greg has no
explanation of how the shoes ended up one hundred miles off of the coast of
Newfoundland, and appeared to be diving to depths of over 1000 feet.

=46EDEX officials were also baffled at the mix-up. On tracing the address of=
 the
house where the package was to be delivered, a FEDEX delivery person
discovered the hooded seal leashed to a dog house in the front yard.  Mrs.
April Bogus Storie said that she didn't remember ordering the shoes but, "I
order lots of stuff from the Home Shopping Network."  When asked about the
seal she stated " Well, I don't exactly remember ordering a guard dog and I
thought it kinda funny, him being so short and so fond of cat food and all,
but he sure is good at keeping the neighborhood cats away."

=3D-=3D-=3D OUT ON THE NET =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=
=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-
=46or additional information, you might want to check out the following
websites. Some of these links represent partners in aquatic conservation
and animal husbandry; others are simply resources we think may help you
enrich your perspective on our watery world. By listing these websites, the
New England Aquarium is not automatically endorsing or verifying the
accuracy of their content unless explicitly stated.

Legos
<http://www.lego.com/>
<http://www.adequate.com/lego/>
<http://www.lugnet.com/fibblesnork/lego/guide/>
<http://www.lugnet.com/cool/>

Sounds of the Sea
<http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/subsecrets/sounds.html>
<http://www.greencafe.com/underwater/index.html>
<http://www.nwf.org/natlwild/1998/whales.html>

Static Electricity
<http://www.waterw.com/~science/january.html>
<http://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/iconelectricity.html>
<http://www.alaska.net/~natnkell/staticgen.htm>
<http://www.coe.ufrj.br/~acmq/electrostatic.html>
<http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/electric.html>

Puffins
<http://www.state.ak.us/adfg/notebook/bird/puffins.htm>
<http://birding.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa082397.htm>

Whale Watches
<http://www.neaq.org/visit/whalewatch.html>

Moray Eels
<http://scuba.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa050598.htm>
<http://touregypt.net/vdc/Rsfish19.htm>
<http://www.gulftel.com/~scubadoc/moray.htm>

White-sided Dolphins
<http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/Canopy/1599/aside.htm>
<http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jaap/lag-acut.htm>

Tracking
<http://www.fedex.com/>

Special Mention
<http://www.neaq.org/corner/membership/>
Just recently added to the website is a greatly expanded membership section,
"How to Help." There's a wealth of information about ways you can be more
involved in the continuing success of the Aquarium in addition to an online
membership application. Take a moment to check it out and support the
Aquarium.

=3D-=3D-=3D LOWELL LECTURE SERIES -- SPRING 1999 =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D=
-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-
Sounds of the Sea: What Do They Do and What Are Their Effects?

The rapid rise of sounds we humans have introduced in the oceans and in our
coastal zones increasingly concerns marine mammal biologists. This Lowell
Lecture series is intended to create a better understanding of the physics a=
nd
environmental role of underwater sound as well as some of the issues now
facing the scientific and regulatory communities.

On April 17, the New England Aquarium opens a new special exhibit in our
Education/Exploration Center called Sounds of the Sea. The Spring 1999 Lowel=
l
Lecture series is devoted to this theme and this exhibit.

Lectures are Wednesday or Thursday evenings at 6:30 p.m. in the Aquarium's
conference center, which is part of the Education/Exploration Center at the
base of the Boston Harbor garage. Each presentation is free to the general
public thanks to the support of the Lowell Institute. Seating is limited and
available on a first-come, first-served basis. Advance tickets are available
by sending e-mail to <kmallory@neaq.org> indicating the lectures of your
choice and the number of tickets requested.

LECTURES
Wednesday, April 14
The once and future ping: The development of acoustic methods to reduce
fishery/marine mammal conflicts.
Scott Kraus, Director of Research, Edgerton Research Laboratory, New England
Aquarium. A large scale double-blind experiment was conducted off the coast =
of
New Hampshire in the autumn of 1994 within an operational groundfish gillnet
fishery. The results indicated that acoustic deterrent devices (ADDs, also
known as pingers) spaced every 95 meters along a gillnet would reduce harbor
porpoise catches by an order of magnitude over "un-pingered" nets. This talk
will raise questions about how pingers work, the upside and downside of thei=
r
use as a management tool for reducing marine mammal deaths, and how they mig=
ht
be deployed in the future.

Thursday, April  22
Whale voices from the deep ocean: What could they be telling us?
Chris Clark, I. P. Johnson Director of Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornel=
l
Lab of Ornithology, Senior Scientist, Section of Neurobiology and Behavior,
Cornell University.
The large whales produce a great variety of sounds and songs, and these seem
to be different between coastal and deep ocean species. Recent access to Nav=
y
arrays indicates the enormous scales over which whales might be communicatin=
g.
Are the different sounds they make an adaptation to their different
environments, and what does this tell us about the whales' dependence on sou=
nd
for survival?  What are the implications of society's increased demands to
probe the ocean with sound for research, exploration, exploitation and
defense?

Thursday, April 29
Are whales harmed when humans introduce loud sounds into the ocean?
Peter Tyack, Ph.D., Associate Scientist, Biology Department, Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institution.
Marine mammals rely upon sound to communicate and to explore their
environment. At the same time, humans are introducing an ever-growing number
of ever-louder noises into the sea. Too much noise could degrade the quality
of critical marine mammal habitats, potentially masking natural sounds or ev=
en
causing animals to avoid an area around the sound source. Tyack will review
U.S. policy regulating ocean noise and will describe recent playback
experiments to study how whales respond to loud low frequency noise source.

Thursday, May 6
Man-made noise in the oceans: Irrelevant or irreparable?
Darlene Ketten, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.;
Harvard Medical School.
Marine mammals, and whales in particular, present an interesting hearing
paradox. On one hand, marine mammal ears physically resemble land mammal ear=
s
and it is likely hearing damage occurs by similar mechanisms in both groups;
i.e., from increases in ambient noise. On the other hand, marine mammals
evolved in a relatively high noise environment, which may mean they have
"tougher" inner ears that are less subject to hearing loss. What is our
current understanding of the hazards from a hearing view point that man-made
noise in the oceans is expected to produce?

Thursday, May 13
ATOC (Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate) and the future of
acoustics in ocean exploration.
Arthur B. Baggeroer, Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair i=
n
Ocean Sciences, Depts. of Ocean and Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Oceanographers have used sound for many important discoveries in ocean
science, so scientists were more than surprised when the Heard Island
=46easibility Test (HIFT) and the subsequent Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean
Climate were met with such strong opposition. This talk will discuss the
controversy surrounding the (ATOC) program to measure changes in ocean
temperature and some of the popular misconceptions about ambient sound in th=
e
ocean. It is not a silent world!  We also will explore the future of acousti=
cs
in ocean exploration and how it is one of the most effective methods for
"imaging" the ocean.

Monday, July 19
Dr. Walter Munk of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography to speak about
ATOC. Details to come.

=3D-=3D-=3D TRAVEL WITH THE AQUARIUM =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D=
-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-
Local trips are selling out, so sign up soon:
Misery Island Tour, Salem Harbor, June 19
Hingham Kayak Trip, June 27
Maine Kayak and Camping Weekend, July 9-11
Gloucester Kayak Trip, July 17
Boston Harbor Island Camping, July 24-25
Boston Harbor Island Camping, August 7-8
Salem Kayak Trip, August 14
Duxbury Kayak Trip, September 11

Contact the travel office at (617) 973-6562 or e-mail <jrankin@neaq.org> for
more information. To register, call our reservations center at (617) 973-520=
6.

=3D-=3D-=3D APRIL CALENDAR =3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=
=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-
Saturday, April 3, Whale Watch, 10 A.M.
Whale watch season begins on April 3! Throughout the month of April, whale
watches will be going out on weekends, though private trips are available up=
on
request. From May to October, we will be running daily whale watches. Prices
are as follows: Adults, $26; Seniors and College Students, $21; Youth (12-18=
),
$19; Children (must be over 3), $16.50. Member and group discounts are
available. Call (617) 973-5281 for reservations and information. Call the
Whale Watch Hotline for recent sightings at (617) 973-5277 after April 3. Lo=
ok
for our new catamaran, the Voyager III, beginning in June.

Saturday, April 10, Aquademics, 11 A.M.
Join us for a lecture-demonstration on setting up home and classroom aquariu=
ms
sponsored by Tetra. $15 per family. Tetra will give each attendee a free
Aquarium pass. Call the reservations center (617) 973-5206 for reservations
and information.

Sunday, April 11, A Look At Fish Explorer Class, 9:30 A.M.
Explorer classes are designed with the preschooler in mind. They include a
story about the sea and a take-home art project or a related activity. The
program lasts one hour and fifteen minutes, and concludes with a visit to se=
e
the featured animal. Classes are limited to 20 children. Children must be
accompanied by an adult. Fees: $4.00 per child for members and $8.00 per chi=
ld
for non-members. No fee for adult participant. The non-member fee does not
include Aquarium admission. Call the reservations center (617) 973-5206 for
reservations and information.

Tuesday, April 13, Antarctic Oasis: Under the Spell of South Georgia. 6 P.M.
The USS Constitution Museum and New England Aquarium present Antarctic Oasis=
:
Under the Spell of South Georgia. Renowned sailors Pauline and Tim Carr
describe their experiences as the only permanent inhabitants on this island
off the coast of Antarctica. Includes a slide presentation and sign language
interpretation. A book signing will follow in the Museum Store. The event
takes place at the USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston MA=
=2E
Call (617) 426-1812 for information, or contact Ken Mallory at (617) 973-529=
5
or via e-mail <kmallory@neaq.org> (provide your name and phone number).
Reservations required.

Wednesday, April 14, Lowell Lecture Series, 6:30 P.M.
The once and future ping: The development of acoustic methods to reduce
fishery/marine mammal conflicts. Scott Kraus, Director of Research, Edgerton
Research Laboratory, New England Aquarium. See above for details.

Saturday, April 17, Sounds of the Sea Exhibit Opens, 10 A.M.
It's noisy down there. The underwater ocean realm is a busy place: walruses
clang, shrimp snap, whales sing, ships roar, fishing boats chug, icebergs
moan, volcanoes erupt, and earthquakes rumble. While listening to these
sounds, find out how the physical structure of the ocean makes it easy for
sound to travel enormous distances underwater with little distortion. Includ=
ed
with Aquarium admission.

Monday, April 19 - Friday, April 23. Spring BreakAway Camp
The New England Aquarium is offering a NEW week-long camp program during
spring school vacation week. BreakAway Camp is available to students in four=
th
through seventh grade. Spring is nature's wake-up call for life to begin aga=
in
and flourish! This program will focus on the natural effects seasons have on
wildlife. Discover signs of life emerging in the salt marshes of Belle Isle =
in
East Boston, Massachusetts. Learn about aquaculture and the life cycles of
commercially important species at a local fish hatchery. Learn about caring
for animals from the wild and a variety of breeding and hand rearing program=
s
at the Trailside Museum in Milton, Massachusetts. Find out about the
Aquarium's Rescue and Rehabilitation Program for marine animals and see anim=
al
husbandry in practice. This program includes time spent in the exhibits and
galleries, a sea lion show, behind the scenes activities, small group projec=
ts
and an overnight at the Aquarium's Education/Exploration Center.
Group Size: Maximum is 25 with a ratio of 8:1.
Schedule: Monday - Friday, 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.
=46ees:  $175/members and $225/non-members
=46or more information, please call our reservations center at (617) 973-520=
6.

Tuesday, April 20, Feeding Time Guided Tour, 9:15 A.M.
Why does one animal receive its food at the end of a stick, while another ma=
y
be fed by hand? During this tour, you'll see what various animals at the
Aquarium eat and the many different ways they are fed. With the lead of an
Aquarium educator, you'll see animals you may not have seen before. Fees:
$4.00 per person for members, $8.00 per person plus admission for non-member=
s.
Tours are limited to 12 people. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Tours are approximately 30 minutes long. Your guide will be available for 15
minutes after the tour to answer questions. Meet your guide at the Informati=
on
Desk in the Aquarium lobby. Call the reservations center (617) 973-5206 for
reservations and information.

Wednesday, April 21, Fierce Fishes Guided Tour, 9:15 A.M.
Piranhas and eels and sharks, oh my! There are many ferocious fish living at
New England Aquarium. Or are there? Come tour through the galleries and get
the real scoop on these and other "dangerous animals." With the lead of an
Aquarium educator, you'll see animals you may not have seen before. Fees:
$4.00 per person for members, $8.00 per person plus admission for non-member=
s.
Tours are limited to 12 people. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Tours are approximately 30 minutes long. Your guide will be available for 15
minutes after the tour to answer questions. Meet your guide at the Informati=
on
Desk in the Aquarium lobby. Call the reservations center (617) 973-5206 for
reservations and information.

Wednesday, April 21, Dive Club Meets, 6:30 P.M.
Dive club meeting in the Aquarium Cafe. Guests and new members always welcom=
e.
Call (617) 973-0240 for details.

Thursday, April 22, Invisible Aquarium Guided Tour, 9:15 A.M.
Many animals in the Aquarium are difficult to see or find. It may be that yo=
u
don't even know they are there! Camouflage and hiding help animals escape
hungry predators. Meet the animals that are just about invisible to most of
our visitors. With the lead of an Aquarium educator, you'll see animals you
may not have seen before. Fees: $4.00 per person for members, $8.00 per pers=
on
plus admission for non-members. Tours are limited to 12 people. Children mus=
t
be accompanied by an adult. Tours are approximately 30 minutes long. Your
guide will be available for 15 minutes after the tour to answer questions.
Meet your guide at the Information Desk in the Aquarium lobby. Call the
reservations center (617) 973-5206 for reservations and information.

Thursday, April  22, Lowell Lecture Series, 6:30 P.M.
Whale voices from the deep ocean: What could they be telling us?
Chris Clark, I. P. Johnson Director of Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornel=
l
Lab of Ornithology, Senior Scientist, Section of Neurobiology and Behavior,
Cornell University. See above for details.

Saturday, April 24, Earthfest, 11 A.M - 6:30 P.M.
Join WBOS-FM and the New England Aquarium for a day of Earth awareness at
Earthfest on the Esplanade, the biggest Earth Day event in the northeast. Ov=
er
100 organizations will be participating, including the New England Aquarium.
Hobnob with traveling tidepool favorites, sea stars, hermit crabs and urchin=
s,
learn all about setting up a home aquarium, try our interactive activities t=
o
learn about whales and sharks, see our "Who Dirtied the Water" program about
Boston Harbor, pick up discount coupons for Aquarium admission and more. Tak=
e
in performances throughout the day by Bruce Hornsby, Duncan Sheik, Melissa
=46errick, Indigenous, Susan Tedeschi, Spin Doctors and more at the Hatch Sh=
ell
on the Esplanade. WBOS is Boston's most environmentally active radio station
and supports the Aquarium through benefit concerts every year.

Sunday, April 25, A Look At Fish Explorer Class, 9:30 A.M.
Explorer classes are designed with the preschooler in mind. They include a
story about the sea and a take-home art project or a related activity. The
program lasts one hour and fifteen minutes, and concludes with a visit to se=
e
the featured animal. Classes are limited to 20 children. Children must be
accompanied by an adult. Fees: $4.00 per child for members and $8.00 per chi=
ld
for non-members. No fee for adult participant. The non-member fee does not
include Aquarium admission. Call the reservations center (617) 973-5206 for
reservations and information.

Tuesday, April 27 - Saturday, May 8. Aquarium Collecting Trip.
Join aquarists on a collecting expedition to the Exumas, Bahamas on a
live-a-board boat. Participants must be 18 years or older. The trip will lea=
ve
from Nassau, Bahamas, travel to San Salvador Island and terminate in Miami,
=46lorida. We will be visiting the new Atlantis Aquarium on Nassau as part o=
f
the trip. The $3,400 price for New England Aquarium members ($3,440 for
non-members) includes airfare, food, alcohol, all collecting equipment, all
live-a-board accommodations, a visit to the Atlantis Aquarium, and a dive in
the Giant Ocean Tank. Participants must supply their own dive equipment. The
last day of the trip is spent packing and shipping fish back to the Aquarium=
=2E
Interested people should call Holly Martel Bourbon at (617) 973-5248, Tuesda=
y
- Saturday or e-mail <hbourbon@neaq.org>.

Thursday, April 29, Lowell Lecture Series, 6:30 P.M.
Are whales harmed when humans introduce loud sounds into the ocean?
Peter Tyack, Ph.D., Associate Scientist, Biology Department, Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institution. See Lowell Lectures for details.

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Just in case it passed any of our international readers by, Happy April Fool=
's
Day! In the American tradition, the first day of April is marked by the
playing of practical jokes on your friends, co-workers, loved ones and
not-so-loved ones. (Aren't we just the zaniest?)  Hence, the Lego, whale wat=
ch
and sticky seal entries. A special thanks to conspirator Bruce Wyman and his
dedicated "focus group." Hope to see you all down here with your ears tuned =
in
to the melodious sounds of container ships and grunting fish. - Jen Goebel