Subject: New England Aquarium Seabits 3.8 (fwd)

mike williamson (williams@www1.wheelock.edu)
Mon, 2 Aug 1999 14:51:10 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: New England Aquarium Seabits 3.8

S E A B I T S 
New England Aquarium Monthly email Newsletter 
<http://www.neaq.org/>
Volume 3, Issue 8, August 1999 
Copyright, New England Aquarium 1999
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ah, summer ... a time for movies, cold drinks, popsicles and, of course,
that wonderful aquatic world that we here at the Aquarium are so devoted
to: the ocean. August brings you an almost overwhelming number of
opportunities to get out there and enjoy beaches, bays, oceans and rivers,
as well as a number of fun activities on our Aquarium Plaza. Sink your
teeth into Swim with the Sharks Day or jog in the bog on our Freshwater Bog
Jog. If you are visiting points south, put your Aquarium membership to good
use at the New England Aquarium Exploration Center in Newport, a brand new
facility right on Easton's beach in Newport, Rhode Island. 

In this issue:
  Watery Words 
  Stories 
    - In the Octopus's Garden
    - Seals Flying Coop to Ireland
    - New England Aquarium ... South
  Animal Updates
    - Stranded Pilot Whales
    - Staccato
    - Green Sea Turtles at Tortuguero Beach
  Out on the Net  
  Back to School Already?
  NEAq August Calendar - Packed
  Newport August Calendar
  Subscribe/Unsubscribe
  Contact Us

***** WATERY WORDS ********************************************************

     "The bunk room I sit in crackles and snaps like the flames 
      of an open fire, our introduction to a chorus of shrimp and 
      other noisy invertebrates which will provide our evening 
      entertainment. Porthole windows are thick with plankton 
      attracted to our night lights, a bonanza for passing fishes 
      that scoop up an unending banquet."
      
            -- Ken Mallory
               New England Aquarium Director of Publishing and Aquanaut,
               writing from Aquarius, a saturation habitat 60 feet
               underwater, where he spent 8 days and nights.

***** STORIES *************************************************************
This month's stories
  1) In the Octopus's Garden
  2) Seals Flying Coop to Ireland
  3) New England Aquarium ... South

----- IN THE OCTOPUS'S GARDEN ---------------------------------------------
Contributed by Greg Stone and Ken Mallory, Aquanauts

They sat next to a big round window with barracuda swimming outside, talked
in high pitched squealing voices and felt dizzy from breathing compressed
gas, but they heartily enjoyed their 8-day undersea experience. Two New
England Aquarium staff members lived 60 feet underwater from July 12-20.
Greg Stone, Aquarium Director of Conservation, and Ken Mallory, Director of
Publishing, were part of a U.S./Japanese aquanaut research team studying
the ocean and changes to the coral reef ecosystem. They lived in the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius
Underwater Habitat located in a beautiful coral garden in the Florida Keys.
The Aquarius habitat, about the size of a small train engine, holds up to 6
aquanauts. 

This was the first joint Aquarius mission with the Japanese. There were 2
Japanese aquanauts and 4 U.S. aquanauts on the mission. Dr. Mineo Okomoto
of the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, the premiere
oceanographic institute in Japan, leads the Japanese team. Dr. Satoshi
Nojima joined him from Kyshu University. Also on the mission were Jay
Styron and Cliff Rassweiler, 2 onboard technicians from University of North
Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) who were responsible for Aquarius and its
crew. The team used state-of-the-art undersea technology to measure
respiration and growth in the coral reef.  This information will be used to
compare with reefs around Japan and in other parts of the world in order to
understand changes in reefs, especially those caused by human activity. The
aquanauts spent their time divided between long diving excursions into the
reef, as deep as 120 feet, conducting research experiments, eating and
sleeping. Aquarius is the only underwater research habitat in the world
where people can actually live and work underwater for weeks at a time.

Aquarius is a saturation habitat, which means that the aquanauts who live
inside the small cylindrical structure are breathing air at the same high
pressure as the water outside and their body tissues, such as muscle and
fat, are "saturated" with nitrogen at more than twice the normal amount. If
they surface too rapidly, the aquanauts will suffer decompression sickness,
with bubbles of nitrogen forming in the blood and body, which can kill or
paralyze them; it takes about 17 hours to decompress from living in
Aquarius. The saturation dive is worth the risks because it makes it
possible for the scientists to work and live at great depths for longer
periods of time than ordinary scuba divers. For example, a regular scuba
diver can stay at 60 feet for only 1 hour before risking decompression
sickness, or "the bends." Saturated divers can stay indefinitely, truly
"living under the sea." 

Aquarius is administered and operated for NOAA by UNCW's National Undersea
Research Center. The Aquarius habitat is part of the U.S. National Undersea
Research Program (NURP). Many people in the ocean community refer to NURP
to as the "NASA of the Sea," even though it is relatively unknown to the
general public. Projects like Aquarius are instrumental and vital to our
growing body of ocean knowledge.

This mission will be the subject of a National Geographic TV documentary to
be aired sometime next year.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Space, what have you done for me lately?
Consider the following:
- We know more about the dark side of the moon than we know about the sea
floor.
- We have sent more people into space than have visited the deepest part of
the ocean.
- We are just beginning to identify and study the incredible diversity of
life forms that live in the ocean's deepest regions. So far, no life in
space.
- Oceans comprise over 70% of our planet's surface and provide air, food
and a moderate climate for humans. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- SEAL FLIES COOP TO IRELAND ------------------------------------------
Contributed by Greg Early, Seal Tracker and Bob Cooper, Tag Attacher

On June 28th a young male gray seal, Bran, was released by the Irish Seal
Sanctuary (located in Dublin) after roughly 6 months rehabilitation.
Several weeks before the release, staff at the Sanctuary contacted
researchers at the New England Aquarium for advice and assistance with
tagging and monitoring the seal's movements after release. 

Original plans called for the staff at the Sanctuary to tag Bran, but with
only several days to go before the release, Scepter Tours of New York
donated a flight. Within 48 hours, Bob Cooper ("Coop") found himself aboard
Air Lingus carrying a tag (donated by Stenaline) and everything he would
need to attach it. This was the first time the Irish Seal Sanctuary was
attaching a satellite tag to a seal, and they wanted to do it right. The
tag is a small box with an antenna that is glued to the seal's fur, and
falls off when it molts. Coop says the tag attachment "on a very
cooperative seal" went off without a hitch. The tag was transmitting as the
seal started off into the water.

The satellite tag can transmit information on where the seal is, as well as
the depth and duration of its dives. To transmit the information, one of
the four polar-orbiting satellites must be in the area and the transmitter
must be out of the water. This information is then emailed to the New
England Aquarium, where Aquarium researcher Greg Early receives it. Bran's
data is then sent to the Sanctuary (posted at <www.irishsealsanctuary.com>
and <www.stenaline.com>) and WhaleNet (<whale.wheelock.edu>). The tags can
transmit for around 3 months, or until they fall off during a seal's annual
molt.

The Irish Seal Sanctuary runs largely on volunteers, a shoestring budget
and donated equipment. The Sanctuary is actually someone's back yard with
two pools, one hand dug. The pool liners were donated. Despite their small
size, the Irish Seal Sanctuary rescued and rehabilitated 22 gray seals this
year, which is the species they see most. They also see common seals, what
we call harbor seals, occasionally. Their rescue and rehabilitation staff
follows roughly the same procedures we do, the major difference is that
they don't have to feed baby gray seals "baby formula" because gray seals
are usually weaned at around 3 weeks of age.

As of the first week of July, Bran had moved north and south along the
Irish coast and headed east to the north coast of Scotland. Greg received
signals for almost 2 weeks, and then, silence. There are several
possibilities: Bran may have gone into a river and the tags don't transmit
in fresh water, or Bran may be in a particular area where land is blocking
the signals, or the tag may be malfunctioning or may have fallen off. There
are other possibilities, too, less cheerful ones, but for right now we are
waiting to see what happens.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Closer to home, "Fat Albert," a young hooded seal, was rescued,
rehabilitated and released by our own New England Aquarium/Fleet Bank
Marine Animal Rescue Team in early April. Carrying a small radio
transmitter, his movements were tracked as he moved into the Bay of Fundy,
then around the coast of Nova Scotia. As of mid July, Albert had moved
north nearly to the Arctic along the coast of Labrador. There it appears he
moved to ice patches off of the coast and began to haul out, most likely to
begin his annual molt.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM ... SOUTH --------------------------------------
The New England Aquarium opened a "branch office" in Newport, Rhode Island
this July. In the space that was formerly the Newport Aquarium and before
that the Rhode Island Fisherman and Whale Museum, the New England Aquarium
Exploration Center at Newport is now open and ready for business. 

Just steps away from the inviting sand and sparkling water of Easton's
Beach, the lower level of the Easton's Beach rotunda is now crawling with,
well, crawling things - tube-footed sea stars, gregarious hermit crabs, shy
clams, spurting scallops, tiny periwinkles and even a lobster or two. In
addition to hands-on exploration of tidepool creatures, the Exploration
Center offers a series of exhibits on marine animals and habitats, focusing
mostly on animals that live in Narragansett Bay. In addition, there are
some art activities, including t-shirt painting, puzzles and a puppet show
stage.

In cooperation with Save The Bay and University of Rhode Island Sea Grant,
the Newport Exploration Center offers guided walks on the beach, lots of
conservation-related activities for kids, a lecture series (see calendar
section for offerings), and a wealth of information on the local habitat.
The Exploration Center provides a place for kids to learn about the
importance of the environment they enjoy and how to protect the beaches and
nearby Narragansett Bay. Our goal in opening up this beachfront aquarium is
to teach kids about the nature they are enjoying and raise their awareness
of the natural world while they are in it!

The Exploration Center staff have planned a theme for each week of the
summer. Themes for August are:
Where are the Fish? Week: August 2-8
Wetlands Week: August 9-15
Sharks and Jellies Week: August 16-22
Southern Visitors Week: August 23-29
Migration Week: August 30-September 6

The Exploration Center is open through Labor Day. Hours are 10 A.M. - 4
P.M. daily, including weekends. Admission is free to New England Aquarium
members; all others pay $2.50. Field trips are also $2.50 per person. A
combo ticket can be purchased for $4. A $25.00 summer family membership is
available. For more information, call (401) 849-8430. 

The New England Aquarium Exploration Center at Newport is supported by a
generous gift from the Alletta Morris McBean Charitable Trust of San
Francisco, California. Additional support was received from the City of
Newport's Parks, Recreation and Tourism Department and the University of
Rhode Island's Coastal Resource Center.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay is a spawning ground and nursery
for over 40,000 species, including flounders, lobsters, oysters and seals.
Power plants located in the Bay's watershed have taken a heavy toll on the
Bay's ecology. Power plants use billions of gallons of cooling water and,
with the water, suck in millions of small fish, eggs and larvae as well as
larger fish and animals. If the crush against intake structures doesn't
kill them, the high temperatures of the generators will. Pollution, habitat
destruction and overfishing have greatly reduced many marine species that
used to be abundant in the Bay, including winter flounder, tautog,
eelgrass, scallops and the now almost never seen Atlantic salmon.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***** ANIMAL UPDATES ******************************************************
This month's announcements
  1) Pilot Whales Take To The Road
  2) Staccato Results In
  3) Go Greens!

----- PILOT WHALES TAKE TO THE ROAD ---------------------------------------
By Sue Knapp, Roving Reporter

On June 28, 1999 the New England Aquarium/Fleet Bank Marine Animal Rescue
Team with help from the Cape Cod Stranding Network rushed to Hardings Beach
in Chatham, Massachusetts, to the aid of two young stranded pilot whales. 
The whales were first sighted near a busy public beach in Harwich the day
before, but they either swam away or perhaps were chased away. 

New England Aquarium veterinarian Andy Stamper assessed the youngsters and
determined, partly because of their youth, they were good candidates for
rehabilitation rather than immediate release to the ocean. Pilot whales can
reach 20 feet in length and weigh up to 3 tons. These 2 juveniles, one
probably recently weaned, were between 8 and 10 feet long and weighed
between 350-400 kg. 

Unfortunately, rehabilitation space for whales is scarce. Luckily, the
Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut agreed to assume the responsibility of
rehabilitation and, hopefully, release of the whales.  

At the time of the stranding, New England was experiencing incredibly hot
and humid weather. If it was uncomfortable for us, it had to be worse for
pilot whales who are used to the frigid temperatures of the Atlantic. The
folks at the International Fund for Animal Welfare, an organization with
the Cape Cod Stranding Network, rented a small moving van and purchased
hundreds of pounds of ice to keep the whales cool. Then, riding in style
and being spritzed with ice water, the pilot whales were driven to
Connecticut.

The veterinarians at the Mystic Aquarium are "cautiously optimistic." The
whales are swimming on their own, eating on their own and seem to be
improving. You can monitor their progress by visiting
<http://www.mysticaquarium.org/>. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Pilot whales are normally in our area this time of year, usually
offshore, though some venture inshore in the winter to follow schools of
squid. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- STACCATO RESULTS IN -------------------------------------------------
You may remember hearing in April about a female North Atlantic right
whale, Staccato, that was found floating dead 6 miles south of Cape Cod.
After being towed to shore, a team of scientists from the New England
Aquarium, Mystic Marinelife Aquarium, the Center for Coastal Studies, Cape
Cod Stranding Network, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) spent several days examining
Staccato and taking blood and tissue samples. At that point, the cause and
time of death could not be precisely determined, though the initial
findings of broken vertebrae and a broken jaw bone indicated that her death
was probably due to a ship strike.

The final necropsy results are in. Staccato's broken jaw bone occurred 7-10
days before her death, and could only be due to a collision with a ship.
Lab studies revealed a cellular response to the broken jaw and a growth of
new cartilage that generally takes 7-10 days. There was also evidence on
her left pectoral flipper of an injury that was probably a week along in
healing. Although she did not die instantly, the injury appears to have
compromised her health so that she developed an infection, blood clotting
and circulatory failure that resulted in her death. The 5 broken vertebrae
could have resulted from the same ship strike, a later ship strike shortly
before her death, or may have occurred during the necropsy. We will
probably never know how that happened. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: To help reduce the risk of collision, the NMFS instituted a
mandatory ship reporting system this year that requires all large ships to
call in before they enter right whale critical habitat areas. When the
ships call in, they receive the latest information on right whale sightings
and how to avoid the whales.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

----- GO GREENS! ----------------------------------------------------------
Finally, some good news about sea turtles! A recent study published in the
journal Conservation Biology reports that the green turtle population of
Tortuguero, Costa Rica seems to be recovering. The number of nests on
Tortuguero's tropical shore has more than doubled, from 20,000 in 1971 to
50,000 in 1996. The decline of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the
1960s was due to wholescale slaughter of the nesting females for turtle
soup. After the Costa Rican government established the area as a national
park, the Caribbean Conservation Corporation, which had been monitoring the
slaughter, started hiring villagers to monitor turtle nestings and develop
a tourist industry around the area's special natural attraction. The
project seems to have worked, as more than 50,000 tourists visit the area
each year to watch the turtles nest and to hike the rainforest.

Green sea turtles are still far from home free. They may have a safe haven
for nesting, but once at sea they are threatened by pollution, hunters from
other areas and entanglement and drowning as bycatch in shrimp trawls and
other fishing gear. But, it's a start.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Droplet: Green sea turtles, the primary ingredient in turtle soup, may take
25 years or more to reach sexual maturity. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***** OUT ON THE NET ******************************************************
For additional information, you might want to check out the following
websites. Some of these links represent partners in aquatic conservation
and animal husbandry; others are simply resources we think may help you
enrich your perspective on our watery world. By listing these websites, the
New England Aquarium is not automatically endorsing or verifying the
accuracy of their content unless explicitly stated.

Aquarius
<http://www.nurp.noaa.gov/aquarius.html>
<http://www.uncwil.edu/nurc/aquarius/index.htm>

Irish Seal Sanctuary & Bran
<http://www.celt.net/iss/index.html>
<http://www.wildireland.ie/contents/wildnews.htm>

Staccato & Right Whales
<http://www.coastalstudies.org/research/stacc2.htm>
<http://www.nmfs.gov/prot_res/cetacean/right.html>
<http://www.neaq.org/corner/res/eg.html>

Conservation Biology & Green Sea Turtles
<http://www.blacksci.co.uk/products/journals/xconb.htm>
<http://www.cccturtle.org/>
<http://www.turtles.org/>

***** BACK TO SCHOOL ALREADY? *********************************************
The Marine Studies Consortium offers the following courses:

FALL 1999:
Marine Biology
Cetacean Biology 
Water Resources Management

SPRING 2000:
Biology of Fishes
Introduction to Marine Mammals
Coastal Zone Management
Maritime History of New England

Fall courses are taught one evening per week beginning in early September.
Undergraduate credit is available to the general public through UMass
Boston or Pine Manor College. Visit the Consortium's website
(<http://www.brandeis.edu/marinestudies/courses.html>) for course syllabus
and registration information, or call (617) 566-8600.

The Marine Studies Consortium is an association of 17 research and
educational institutions in Massachusetts (including the New England
Aquarium) which combine resources to increase understanding of marine
science and environmental management.  

***** NEAQ AUGUST CALENDAR ************************************************
Tuesday, August 3, North End Night Out, 6-10 P.M.
The traveling tidepool will be visiting the North End National Night Out
celebration. Meet Sammy the Seal, and learn about the animals in our
hands-on tidepool at the Prado Park on Hanover Street. Free.

Wednesday, August 4, Traveling Tidepool, 5 - 8 P.M.
The traveling tidepool visits the Emerald Square Mall in Attleboro. Learn
about horseshoe crabs, sea stars, scallops and clams up close and personal.
Kids will have a chance to be the "sea star" in a "New Tidepool Revue"
performance. Free.

Saturday, August 7, Sea Otter Surprise Preschool Explorer Class, 9:30 A.M. 
Designed with the preschooler in mind, this program combines a story about
sea otters and a take-home art project, a related activity, or a closer
look at some live animals. One hour and fifteen minutes. Classes are
limited to 20 children. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Fees:
$4.00 per child for members and $8.00 per child for non-members. No fee for
adult participant. The non-member fee does not include Aquarium admission.
Please call (617) 973-5206 for reservations and information.

Saturday-Sunday, August 7-8, Boston Harbor Island Camping
Join Aquarium naturalists for a fun weekend of camping and nature-gawking
on a Boston Harbor Island. We provide the tents and rations, including
home-made bread. Trip includes round-trip water transportation to islands
from the New England Aquarium. Once there, we offer guided natural history
walks, led by New England Aquarium naturalists, tidepool explorations,
snorkeling, star gazing (weather permitting), a potluck barbecue, and fun
and informative programs. For more information, please call Jeanne Rankin
in the Travel Office at (617) 973-6562, or email jrankin@neaq.org. For
reservations and fees, please call (617) 973-5206.

Saturday-Sunday, August 7-8, Tetra Days, 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Join us for Tetra Days, a weekend celebrating home aquariums. Activities on
the Aquarium's plaza include face painting, temporary tattoos, educational
programming and a chance to win a home aquarium from Tetra. 

Saturday, August 7, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M. 
(details above)

Saturday, August 7, Traveling Tidepool, 2-6 P.M.
The traveling tidepool will be at the Hatch Shell on the Esplanade as part
of the WODS 103 FM concert series celebration. Learn about horseshoe crabs,
sea stars, scallops and clams up close and personal. Free.

Sunday, August 8, North End Pride Day, 12 Noon - 4 P.M.
The traveling tidepool will be visiting North End Pride Day celebration.
Meet Sammy the Seal, and learn about the animals in our hands-on tidepool
at the Poupolo Park on Commercial Street. Free.

Sunday, August 8, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M. 
(details above) 

Wednesday, August 11, Coastal Rhythms Exhibit Guided Tour, 9:15 A.M. 
Life moves in rhythms on the coast, and the fishes, crabs, shorebirds sing
along. But slowly, the rhythms are changing. Meet amazing animals that move
to these rhythms and learn about how they live in today's changing world.
Fees: $4.00 per  person for members, $8.00 per person plus admission for
non-members, unless otherwise  specified. Tours are limited to 12 people.
Children must be accompanied by an adult. Tours are approximately 30
minutes long. Your guide will be available for 15 minutes after  the tour
to answer questions. Meet your guide at the Information Desk in the
Aquarium lobby. 

Friday, August 13, Dr. Rory Wilson, 12 Noon
Dr. Rory Wilson, a penguin expert from the University of Kiehl, Germany,
will present a seminar entitled, "Intra-specific plasticity in foraging
Magellanic Penguins: The highs and lows of life at the limit." A highly
respected researcher known world-wide for his pioneering work on the
physiological ecology, behavior, and energetics of seabirds and penguins,
Dr. Wilson is an engaging speaker. He will talk about his studies of
free-ranging animals studied with biotelemetry devices. The talk will take
place in the New England Aquarium's Conference Center and is free and open
to the public.

Saturday, August 14, Tidepool Trek, Marblehead, 10:00 A.M.  - 12:00 Noon 
Join Aquarium educators for a tidepool expedition. You will collect coastal
animals, observe them, and then return them to their habitats. With field
guides and microscopes, learn how to identify marine life and see how
animals have adapted to live in their "rocky" world. In this program,
participants can make and take home a personal tidepool diary. Fees: $8.00
per person for members, $16.00 per person for non-members. Non-member price
does not include Aquarium admission. Call (617) 973-5206 for reservations.

Saturday, August 14, Kayak Salem Harbor
Join us on the North Shore to experience the scenic views of the islands
and wildlife of Salem Sound. For fees and information, call the Travel
Office at (617) 973-6562.

Saturday, August 14, KISS 108 Traveling Beach Party, 3-5 P.M.
DJs from KISS 108 will be on the Aquarium Plaza for a beach party,
featuring the KISS 108 Music Machine, games and prizes. Free. Does not
include Aquarium admission.

Saturday, August 14, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M. 
(details above)

Sunday, August 14, Traveling Tidepool Soccer, 7:30 P.M.
The traveling tidepool heads to Framingham for the Boston Renegades soccer
game. At half time, selected members of the audience will get an
opportunity to kick penalty shots with New England Aquarium's Sammy the
Seal and Boston Bulldogs/Renegades Spike the Dog. Prizes will be
distributed. Game is held at Bowditch Field in Framingham. Tickets are $8
for adults and $4 for children. Call (508) 870-0057 for ticket information
and directions.

Sunday, August 15, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M. 
(details above) 

Sunday, August 15, Bumpkin Island Day Trip, 9:30 A.M.  - 4:30 P.M. 
Aquarium educators will provide information and activities for you and your
family on the ferry ride that brings us to our destination. Enjoy the
sights and sounds of Boston Harbor Islands as we head out to Bumpkin Island
and the tidepools that await us. We'll learn about island lore as we spend
the day exploring the rocky shore and sand dunes of the island and observe
the wide variety of birds that nest and breed there. Participants should
bring their own lunch and a swimsuit. An afternoon snack and beverages will
be provided. Cost includes round trip fee for ferry. Fees: $35 per person
for members, $50 per person for non-members. Non-member price does not
include Aquarium admission. Please call (617) 973-5206 for reservations.

Wednesday, August 18, Dive Club Meeting, 6:30 P.M.  
Dive club meeting at New England Aquarium. Guests and new members always
welcome. Call (617) 973-0240 for details. Meeting location: Studio 2 in the
New England Aquarium Exploration Center.

Friday, August 20, Swim with the Sharks, 10 A.M.  - 4 P.M. 
Learn about these much maligned and misunderstood ocean creatures in a day
dedicated to sharks and shark issues. Test your knowledge with Shark
Jeopardy and the Mystery of the Great Sand Tiger Shark Scavenger Hunt.
Included with Aquarium admission.

Saturday, August 21, Freshwater Bog Jog, 10 A.M.  - 1 P.M. 
Follow an Aquarium educator for a guided tour on the boardwalk and seek out
carnivorous plants, wild cranberries, and rare endangered species that call
the bog their home. Have you ever seen a "quaking bog?" Did you know there
is a local wetland where the wildlife is so wild, the plants eat animals?
Follow an Aquarium educator for a guided tour on the boardwalk and seek out
carnivorous plants, wild cranberries, and rare endangered species that call
the bog their home. Your family can experience the fascinating and often
bizarre life in this critically endangered area. Minimum group is 12,
maximum is 20. Fees:  $8.00 per person for members, $16.00 per person for
non-members. Non-member price does not include Aquarium admission.

Saturday, August 21, Sea Otter Surprise Preschool Explorer Class, 9:30 A.M. 
This program combines a story about sea otters with a take-home art
project, a related activity, or a closer look at some live animals. The
program lasts one hour and fifteen minutes, and concludes with a visit to
see the featured animal. Choose to attend any one of the programs, or the
entire series. Programs meet in the Exploration Center on Saturday mornings
at 9:30 A.M.  Please note that due to the overwhelming popularity of these
programs, we are offering two sessions of each class per month. Classes are
limited to 20 children. Children must be accompanied by adults. Fees: $4.00
per child for members and $8.00 per child for non-members. No fee for adult
participant. The non-member fee does not include Aquarium admission.

Saturday, August 21, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M.
(details above)

Sunday, August 22, Pepsi Day at the New England Aquarium, 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Aquarium sponsor Pepsi will be hosting games and activities on the Aquarium
plaza, including a moon bounce and prizes. Free. Does not include Aquarium
admission.

Sunday, August 22, KISS 108 Traveling Beach Party, 3-5 P.M.
DJs from KISS 108 will be on the Aquarium Plaza for a beach party,
featuring the KISS 108 Music Machine, games and prizes. Free. Does not
include Aquarium admission.

Sunday, August 22, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M.
(details above) 

Saturday, August 28, Traveling Tidepool, 12 Noon - 2 P.M.
The traveling tidepool visits the Westgate Mall in Brockton. Learn about
horseshoe crabs, sea stars, scallops and clams up close and personal. Kids
will have a chance to be the "sea star" in a "New Tidepool Revue"
performance. Free.

Saturday, August 28, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M.
(details above)

Sunday, August 29, Evening Lighthouse Nature Cruise, 7-9 P.M.
(details above) 

***** NEWPORT AUGUST CALENDAR *********************************************
NEWPORT Wednesday, August 4, Wise Fishing Techniques, 10:30 A.M. 
Cod, flounder, swordfish, scallops and other marine animals are rapidly
disappearing. What's happening to the people who depend on fishing? Are
there solutions? Dr. Marianne Farrington will teach you all about wise
fishing techniques and talk about the problems facing our fisheries. $2.50
per person. At the Exploration Center in Newport. For more information,
call (401) 849-8430.

NEWPORT Friday, August 6, Shellfish Challenge, 11 A.M.
Take the Shellfish Challenge with Save The Bay educators as part of the
Newport Exploration Center's Where are the Fish? Week. $2.50 per person. At
the Exploration Center in Newport, Rhode Island. For more information, call
(401) 849-8430.

NEWPORT Friday, August 13, Bay Experience, 11 A.M.
Save The Bay's Bob Jessup leads a freshwater wetland nature walk in
celebration of Wetlands Week at the Newport Exploration Center. $2.50 per
person. For more information, call (401) 849-8430.

NEWPORT Saturday, August 14, Sea Level and Hurricanes, 3 P.M.
Join Brown University geologist Jeff Donnelly for a talk on how hurricanes
affect salt marshes and other wetlands as part of the Newport Exploration
Center's Wetlands Week. $2.50 per person. For more information, call (401)
849-8430.

NEWPORT Saturday, August 21, Bay Adventure, 10 A.M. and 1 P.M.
Join Save The Bay and Project Oceanology staff aboard the 70-foot research
vessel Enviro-Lab III for a 2.5 hour scientific expedition into
Narragansett Bay. Leaves from Newport Shipyard. Two trips are available,
one departing at 10 A.M. and the other at 1 P.M. Tickets are available at
the Newport Exploration Center. For more information, call (401) 849-8430.

NEWPORT Friday, August 20, Jellies, 11 A.M.
Bob Jessup from Save The Bay will take you up close and personal with sea
jellies as part of the Newport Exploration Center's Sharks and Jellies
Week. Also, make model sea jellies and create and deploy stinging cells
like jellies. $2.50 per person. For more information, call (401) 849-8430.

NEWPORT Tuesday, August 24, Sea Turtles, 11 A.M.
Join Caribbean Conservation Corporation scientist Carmel McGill Siegmund to
learn all about sea turtles and how these Caribbean animals sometimes end
up in our cold, northern waters as part of Southern Visitors' Week. The
Caribbean Conservation Corporation has been working to save endangered and
threatened sea turtles in our waters for over 50 years. $2.50 per person.
At the Newport Exploration Center. For more information, call (401)
849-8430.

NEWPORT Friday, August 27, Eelgrass Man Puppet Show, 11 A.M.
An incredible two-person puppet, Eelgrass Man, teaches kids all about the
importance of eelgrass to local animals as part of Southern Visitors Week
(referring to animals "hitchhiking" the warm waters of the Gulf Stream and
visiting our area). $2.50 per person. At the Newport Exploration Center.
For more information, call (401) 849-8430.

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Eat, drink and bask in the sun (with SPF 15, at least), for tomorrow it
will be September. - Jen Goebel