Info: Phila Whale

Michael Williamson (whe_william@flo.org)
Mon, 10 Dec 1994 14:18:47

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Date: Sat, 10 Dec 1994 14:14:05 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@flo.org>
Subject: Info: Phila Whale
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET"  9-DEC-1994 18:10:28.85
To:	WHE_WILLIAM
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Subj:	Philadelphia Whale
 
Date:         Fri, 9 Dec 1994 15:00:57 PST
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
              <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
Sender:       Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
              <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
From:         r.mallon1@genie.geis.com
Subject:      Philadelphia Whale
To:           Multiple recipients of list MARMAM <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
Philadelphia Whale
PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 8 (UPI) -- A rare North Atlantic right whale that
wandered up the Delaware River last weekend still can't seem to get it
right.
   Two days after it was seemingly headed back to the ocean, the whale
wasspotted by a tugboat crew Thursday morning, swimming upriver near the
Sun Oil refinery in the Philadelphia suburb of Marcus Hook.
   The Coast Guard said the whale, one of only about 300 in the world,
may be injured or dragging a fishing net of other submerged object.
Marine police divers were hoping to get close enough to check it for
possible wounds.
   The whale, which is about 30-feet long and weighs an estimated 20
tons, spent the weekend swimming in circles off Philadelphia, 80 miles
from the Atlantic Ocean, before heading downriver to the Delaware Bay.
   Marine biologists thought the mammal might make it back to sea, but
it apparently reversed direction sometime Wednesday. Coast Guard
officials said as long as the whale remained in the river it was in
danger of being struck by a ship.
   Officials with the National Marine Fisheries Service may try to herd
the whale downriver with Coast Guard vessels or attempt to lure it back
to the ocean with recorded whale sounds.
   Kim Thounhurst, a spokesman for the federal agency, said if that
doesn't work, the whale could be captured in a net and released in the
open sea. But she said that option would be a last resort because it
would be traumatic for the whale.