Info: pilot Whale Stranding New Zealand

Michael Williamson (whe_william@flo.org)
Mon, 15 Jan 1995 16:03:06

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Date: Sun, 15 Jan 1995 16:04:56 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@FLO.ORG>
Subject: Info: pilot Whale Stranding New Zealand
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET" 15-JAN-1995 12:42:32.24
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Subj:	WHALES STRAND AT PAKAWAU BEACH, RESCUED WITHIN AN HOUR
 
Date:         Sun, 15 Jan 1995 19:46:26 +1300
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From:         Terry Hardie <terry@bytes.gen.nz>
Subject:      WHALES STRAND AT PAKAWAU BEACH, RESCUED WITHIN AN HOUR
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NZPA
 
15-Jan-95 05:27 pm Regular  National
 
WHALES STRAND AT PAKAWAU BEACH, RESCUED WITHIN AN HOUR
 
 
   Wellington, Jan 15 - About six pilot whales stranded themselves
at Pakawau Beach, between Collingwood and Farewell Spit in Golden
Bay, this afternoon but were rescued within an hour.
   Department of Conservation Takaka field centre manager Geoff
Rennison told NZPA about half a dozen whales, believed to be from a
pod which had been sticking close to the shore for the past few
days, became stranded about 3.30pm.
   Staff were sent to the scene immediately and boats were launched,
despite rough conditions, when it was noticed the rest of the
100-member pod was starting to come in to shore.
   However, Mr Rennison said by 4.30pm the whales were off the beach
and all were 300-400 metres out to sea.
   ``There's a lot of hard work going on there right now because
they are still very close to the shore. The tide is now rising,
which is good, but the wind and the seas are not good. It's not a
pleasant day out there,'' he said.
   The stranding provided some excitement on a day when the weather
restricted many monitoring activities.
   The whale pod, believed to have come inshore to calve, was
located this morning out to sea and quite a few kilometres south of
where it was yesterday. It then moved north, back to where the
whales spent most of the previous three days.
   Three boats were sent out to follow them and ensure they did not
charge for the beach, but the boats were forced to turn back when
the winds and seas whipped up late in the morning.
   A spotter aircraft was also grounded by the wind.
   DOC then received a report of a second pod of about 40 pilot
whales which were close to stranding several kilometres south. The
pod turned out to consist mainly of dolphins. It backed off the
beach and moved north along the coast, shadowed by DOC staff.
   ``The whale segment of them was seen to detach and swim out
towards the horizon and disappear, and we haven't seen them since,''
Mr Rennison said.
   He said this group appeared to be separate from the one at
Pakawau.
 
 
NZPA WGT am acb