Info: Dolphin Stranding

Michael Williamson (whe_william@flo.org)
Mon, 9 Dec 1995 08:56:10

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Date: Sat, 09 Dec 1995 08:52:07 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@FLO.ORG>
Subject: Info: Dolphin Stranding
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET"  9-DEC-1995 00:35:51.69
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Subj:	SA: STRANDED DOLPHINS SAVED BY
 
Date:         Fri, 8 Dec 1995 21:17:45 -0800
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
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From:         r.mallon1@genie.com
Subject:      SA: STRANDED DOLPHINS SAVED BY
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SA: STRANDED DOLPHINS SAVED BY CLEAR-THINKING LOCALS
 
   ADELAIDE, Dec 6 AAP - Two adult dolphins stranded yesterday on
tidal sands in South Australia's Coffin Bay National Park owe their
lives to the efforts of two local people, wildlife authorities said
today.
   National Parks and Wildlife Service west district manager Ross
Allen said Tom Hyde and Myriam Sheehy (Sheehy) were out walking
around 3pm when they discovered the female Bottlenose Dolphins,
some two-metres in length and weighing about 300kg each.
   Tom, 21, and Myriam, 18, kept the animals wet, covered them in
clothing to guard against sunburn, and telephoned wildlife
authorities.
    "They were out on the sandflats and initially we thought they
were dead," said Tom, who lives on a farm at nearby Coomunga, about
10km north of Port Lincoln, 670km west of Adelaide.
   "We only saw one at the start and when it began breathing that
gave us bit of a fright."
   "I'm sure that if they (Tom and Myriam) had done nothing,it
would have been absolutely disastrous for the dolphins," Mr Allen
said. "They might well have died."
   A team of four National Parks and Wildlife Service officers
arrived at the scene, digging in under the dolphins to place them
on slings specially designed for the retrieval of marine animals.
   Their size and weight meant it took the NPWS staff an hour to
lift each dolphin across 200-300 metres of sand flats and back out
to sea.
   Mr Allen said the dolphins were probably stranded after chasing
fish in the shallows and  and misjudging the tide.
   He said it was rare for authorities to find Bottlenose dolphins
stranded because they lived near the shore and were used to fishing
close-in.
   "The first thing to do is to get water on them (stranded
dolphins), to make them feel comfortable, which they did, and they
had some clothing they got wet and then draped over them," Mr Allen
said.
   "So by the time we got to them, they weren't in too bad (a)
condition, though theywere showing some signs of distress and
sunburn.
   "It took us the best part of an hour each (dolphin), to get them
back into the water. They were that heavy."