Wandering Manatee (fwd)

Michael Williamson (pita@whale.simmons.edu)
Mon, 26 Feb 1996 08:25:04

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Date: Mon, 26 Feb 1996 08:19:19 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <pita@whale.simmons.edu>
Subject: Wandering Manatee (fwd)
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---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 26 Feb 96 12:31:00 UTC 0000
From: r.mallon1@genie.com
To: marmam@uvvm.uvic.ca, pita@whale.simmons.edu
Subject: Wandering Manatee
 
Wandering Manatee
 
   PORT EVERGLADES, Fla. (AP) -- Chessie, the manatee who traveled
up the Atlantic Seaboard the past two summers, is back home again --
this time outfitted with a transmitter in case he takes off again.
   Biologists hope to keep tabs on the endangered species, which is
threatened by speeding boats, the destruction of sea grass beds and
the development of waterfronts for marinas.
   The transmitter attached to Chessie will be monitored by
satellite.
   "He stands out because he's only got one gray scar," said Kit
Curtin, a researcher who tracks the mammals for the Save the
Manatee Club. "About 90 percent of the animals we see have many
scars from boat propellers."
   Despite near-record counts of manatee deaths in Florida the past
two years, researchers are seeing more sea cows than ever. They
counted a record 2,639 manatees during aerial surveys last week,
breaking the previous high set a month before.
   Chessie has been seen splashing around warm water being
discharged by a power plant in Port Everglades.
   In the fall of 1994, he was rescued from the Chesapeake Bay,
which is considered far beyond the range of Florida manatees.
   After he was returned to Florida and released, he headed north
again when the weather got warm. Last summer, he went beyond the
Chesapeake and reached Port Judith, R.I., in August.