Subject: Case Study: Whale meat on Sale

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Mon, 13 Nov 1994 08:59:47

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From: WHE_WILLIAM@flo.org
Subject: Case Study: Whale meat on Sale
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET" 12-NOV-1994 18:24:07.22
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Subj:	Whale meat to go on sale
 
Date:         Sat, 12 Nov 1994 12:57:00 UTC
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
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From:         r.mallon1@genie.geis.com
Subject:      Whale meat to go on sale
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Whale meat to go on sale in Japan
    TOKYO, Nov 11 (Reuter) - Japan, under strong pressure from
foreign governments and environmental groups to halt its
research hunting of whales, will soon begin selling 65 tonnes of
minke whalemeat caught in the northwestern Pacific.
    Kyodo news agency quoted the Institute of Cetacean Research,
which conducts research on behalf of the government, as saying
on Friday that the meat was from 21 minke whales caught between
late June and early September for research purposes.
    Japan has been conducting similar research whaling on minke
whales in the Antarctic.
    The International Whaling Commission imposed a worldwide
moratorium on commercial whaling in 1985 but it allowed limited
catches of minke whales for research purposes.
    The institute said 35 tonnes would be used for processing,
24 tonnes for table use and six tonnes for medical purposes.
    It said the meat would be sold to wholesalers in 18 of 47
prefectures across the nation at about 3,730 yen ($38) per kg
($17 per pound).
    Japan, the world's biggest consumer of whalemeat, insists
that successive ``research'' missions to the Antarctic have
shown that stocks in some areas have recovered enough to sustain
limited commercial catches.