Subject: Case Study: Seal Slashing Question

Michael Williamson (whe_william)
Mon, 12 Jan 1995 19:52:27

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Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 19:39:43 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@FLO.ORG>
Subject: Case Study: Seal Slashing Question
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET" 12-JAN-1995 14:23:32.60
To:	WHE_WILLIAM
CC:	
Subj:	Re: Seals found slashed in NY
 
Date:         Thu, 12 Jan 1995 11:19:21 PST
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
              <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
Sender:       Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
              <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
From:         wayne stobo <w_stobo@BIONET.BIO.DFO.CA>
Subject:      Re: Seals found slashed in NY
To:           Multiple recipients of list MARMAM <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Seals found slashed in NY
>     NEW YORK, Jan. 10 (UPI) -- Three harbor seals have been viciously
>slashed in the Atlantic Ocean off the Long Island coast over the past
>few months, prompting a federal investigation into the matter, it was
>announced Tuesday.
>   The latest victim, a 6-month-old female, was rescued Monday, but her
>chances for survival are slim.
>   "We don't know if she's going to survive," said Kim Durham, staff
>biologist for Okeanos, a non profit organization that runs the state's
>Marine Mammal Stranded Program.
>   "The two other animals died from infections, basically they died
>from blood poisoning brought on by their wounds," she said.
>   Harbor seals are small mammals, weighing between 40 and 50 pounds.
>   Okeanos workers picked up the first slashed seal on Nov. 8. All three
>were found at the eastern tip of Long Island, the latest near the Fire
>Island lighthouse.
>   "At this point we have no idea who did this or why," Durham said.
>"These animals all federally protected," she added. "Technically it's
>against the law to even feed them."
>   The seals migrate to Long Island during the winter months and dozens
>of them can be seen at low tide on clear days sunning themselves on the
>rocks.
>   "Usually it's a pretty nice life," Durham said.
>   Durham said the National Marine Fishery Service, the Department of
>Environmental Conservation and the U.S. Coast Guard are all involved in
>investigating the slashings.
 
Hi, Wayne Stobo responding to your note on harbor seal slashing.  Are you
certain that it is not a shark attack?  Over the last several years we have
found harbor seal pups (25-50 lbs.) which have been killed by shark attacks
- but the appearance of the pelt is that someone, or something, took a
razor and sliced them from head to tail, one or more times (when more than
once, the slashes are parallel); when the pelt is put back together it
appears as a corkscrew slash in most cases.  We are certain that these are
shark attacks and a colleague of mine is researching the species of shark
which may be responsible.  Please have Ms. Durham or the appropriate
authority contact me if they wish more information.
 
Thanks.
 
--
Dr. Wayne Stobo (w_stobo@bionet.bio.ns.ca)
Marine Fish Division
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
P.O. Box 1006
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
B2Y 4A2
 
902-426-3316 (voice)
902-426-1506 (FAX)