Subject: Info: JAPAN NOT IN BREACH OF TREATY

Michael Williamson (whe_william)
Mon, 15 Feb 1995 12:21:48

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Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 12:15:55 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@FLO.ORG>
Subject: Info: JAPAN NOT IN BREACH OF TREATY
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Subj:	JAPAN NOT IN BREACH OF TREATY
 
Date:         Wed, 15 Feb 1995 11:49:00 UTC
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
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From:         r.mallon1@genie.geis.com
Subject:      JAPAN NOT IN BREACH OF TREATY
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JAPAN NOT IN BREACH OF TREATY BUT CONTRARY TO IWC SPIRIT
 
   CANBERRA, Feb 15 AAP - Japan's hunting of minke whales in
Antarctic waters was contrary to the spirit of the International
Whaling Commission (IWC) but did not breach the whaling convention,
Australia's whaling commissioner Peter Bridgewater said today.
   Dr Bridgewater, who also chairs the IWC, said Japan had
foreshadowed the killing of 330 minke whales this summer as part of
its research program.
   Japan's program is made possible under article 18 of the
convention, which allows IWC members to issue permits to themselves
for scientific research.
   Dr Bridgewater said the Australian government supported the need
for scientific research of the world's whale population but
believed any research necessary could be done by non-lethal means.
   Japan and Norway, though, disagreed.
   "Japan is not doing anything that the convention does not
allow," Dr Bridgewater said.
   "It has not done anything that it has not previously announced
and been examined by the commission."
   But it had ignored the IWC's resolution passed in Mexico last
year recommending Japan restructure its research program so that
research interests could be addressed with non-lethal methods.
   "It's certainly going against the spirit of the commission," Dr
Bridgewater said.
   The Australian government last December expressed regret that
Japan had decided to continue killing whales as part of its
scientific program, stating these actions in the Southern Ocean
were of a scale and nature that subverted the intent of the IWC
moratorium on commercial whaling.
   Dr Bridgewater said Australia also made representations to the
Japanese government in Tokyo last month in an effort to prevent the
killings.
   Greenpeace activists, operating from the Rainbow Warrior II,
have been trying to disrupt Japanese whalers in the newly
established international whale sanctuary by placing inflatable
boats between the hunters and the whales.
   Greenpeace claims to have photographed yesterday a fleet of four
vessels operating 1,200 km inside the sanctuary.
   A Greenpeace spokesman said the whalers were hunting openly with
the harpoons uncovered, despite the six-week-old international
treaty banning commercial hunting of whales in the southern waters.
   Of the 24 IWC nations with a vote, Japan was the only country to
vote against the sanctuary.