Subject: Info:FLIPPER EXPOSED AS VICIOUS KILLER

Michael Williamson (whe_william)
Mon, 18 Mar 1995 11:20:44

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Date: Sat, 18 Mar 1995 11:21:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Michael Williamson <WHE_WILLIAM@FLO.ORG>
Subject: Info:FLIPPER EXPOSED AS VICIOUS KILLER
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From:	SMTP%"MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET" 14-MAR-1995 14:21:17.80
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Subj:	FLIPPER EXPOSED AS VICIOUS KILLER
 
Date:         Tue, 14 Mar 1995 11:16:18 PST
Reply-To:     Marine Mammals Research and Conservation Discussion
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From:         Terry Hardie <terry@bytes.gen.nz>
Subject:      FLIPPER EXPOSED AS VICIOUS KILLER
To:           Multiple recipients of list MARMAM <MARMAM@UVVM.BITNET>
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
11-Mar-95 07:25 am Regular  International
 
FLIPPER EXPOSED AS VICIOUS KILLER
 
 
   NZPA correspondent
   London, March 10 - The ``Flipper'' image of dolphins being
friendly creatures has been shattered by new evidence showing them
killing their smaller relatives, the porpoise.
   A natural history programme screened on BBC television last night
showed footage of two dolphins attacking a porpoise -- flipping it
up in the air with their beaks and then battering its back when it
landed on the water.
   The programme's producer Sally Wilson said the way dolphins
``play'' with porpoises was similar to killer whales playing with
seals.
   ``The kill can take up to 45 minutes,'' she said.
   The Daily Telegraph reported today that 40 porpoises washed on
the Moray Firth in northeast Scotland between 1991 and 1993 had been
found to have been killed by ``massive multiple trauma''. No part of
the porpoises had been eaten.
   Scientists, at first puzzled by the deaths, noticed marks on the
porpoises that matched the teeth spacings on dolphins. But there
were doubts until some attacks were filmed.
   Dolphin expert Ben Wilson, of Aberdeen University, said the
dolphins may have had a problem of recognition.
   ``Dolphins are afraid of big sharks and this could be leading
them to attack porpoises,'' he said.
   ``Other theories are that it is aberrant behaviour in two
dolphins or that there is some sort of stress exerted in the firth,
which leads to this behaviour.''
   The Telegraph says there had also been reports of isolated
attacks by dolphins on porpoises in the Pacific.
 
 
NZPA LDN nb bs