Subject: WhaleNet Info Packet

Michael Williamson (williams@whale.simmons.edu)
Wed, 20 Mar 1996 08:37:21 -0500 (EST)

WHALENET INFORMATION PACKET
(for a hard copy please send your name and address)



http://whale.simmons.edu
>                          WhaleNet Brouchure
> 
>                               [Image]
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>                               WhaleNet
> 
>             Interactive Education with Telecommunications
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Welcome to WhaleNet
> 
> The mission of WhaleNet is to implement an interdisciplinary
> student-centered interactive educational program focussed on whales,
> the marine habitat, and environmental studies. The program provides
> a range of high interest "hands-on" materials and supplementary
> curricular activities that will stimulate interest in and a desire
> for learning. Emphasizing the use of advanced technologies and
> telecommunications, WhaleNet provides access to resources which
> enhances environmental awareness, while developing interest in
> science and improving skills in problem solving and critical
> thinking.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> This packet gives you the information that you need to access and to
> begin using WhaleNet in your classroom. This packet contains the
> following information:
> 
>    * 1. Instructions on How to Access WhaleNet
>    * 2. Start-up WhaleNet Activities
>    * 3. Instructions for recording and using data.
>    * 4. Instructions on how to input data into the WhaleNet program
>    * 5. Marine mammal species sheet with abbreviations
>    * 6. Whale Study and Pollution Data Sheets
>    * 7. WhaleNet data base Information Sheet
>    * 8. Supplemental Materials information
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> WhaleNet is a teacher enhancement project funded by the National
> Science Foundation (RED-9454757) and sponsored by Wheelock College
> and Simmons College in Boston. The purpose of the WhaleNet is to
> enhance science education and environmental awareness using
> interdisciplinary learning through the use of telecommunications.
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>      Affiliates' Organizations Include:
> 
>    * Allied Whale, College of the Atlantic
>    * American Cetacean Society
>    * Atlantic Cetacean Research Center
>    * Bolt Beranek & Newman
>    * Boston Museum of Science
>    * Briar Island Ocean Study, N.S.
>    * Buffalo Museum of Science
>    * Cape Ann Whale Watch
>    * Captain Tim Brady & Sons Whale Watch
>    * Carolina Ocean Study Programs
>    * Center for Whale Research
>    * Cetacean Research Program
>    * Cetacean Society International
>    * Ceta-Research, Inc., Nfld..
>    * Compagnie de la Baie de Tadoussac, P.Q.
>    * Dolphin Fleet Whale Watch
>    * East Coast Ecosystems, N.S.
>    * East India Cruise Co.
>    * Frenchman Bay Whale Watch Co.
>    * Friday Harbor Whale Museum
>    * Gulf of Maine Aquarium
>    * Gulf of Maine Marine Ed. Assoc.
>    * Harbor Explorations, UMass/Boston
>    * Hatfield Marine Science Center, OR
>    * Hyannis Whale Watcher
>    * International Wildlife Coalition
>    * Isles of Shoals Steamship Co.
>    * Los Angeles Museum of Natural History
>    * Manomet Bird Observatory
>    * Marine Education Center of Cape Ann
>    * Marine Education & Research Group
>    * Marine Mammal Center
>    * Massachusetts Audubon Society
>    * Massachusetts Marine Educators
>    * Massachusetts Water Resources Authority
>    * Mingan Island Cetacean Study
>    * Museum Institute for Teaching Science
>    * Newburyport Whale Watch
>    * New England Aquarium
>    *  Pelagic Research Lab -NEA
>    *  Stranding Network-NEA
>    *  Teacher Resource Center-NEA
>    * New England Science Center
>    * New England Whale Watch
>    * New Hampshire Seacoast Cruises
>    * NPAC- Syracuse University
>    * NMFS-NE Fisheries
>    * NOAA Marine Sanctury-Stellwagen Bank
>    * North Carolina Sea Grant
>    * Northeast Whale Watch
>    * Ocean Society
>    * Odyssey Whale Watch
>    * Portuguese Princess Whale Watch
>    * Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies
>    * Quebec-Labrador Foundation
>    * Seattle Public Schools
>    * Seven Seas Whale Watch
>    * Simmons College
>    * Tabor Academy
>    * Twillingate Island Boat Tours, Nfld.
>    * U. of Alaska Southeast
>    * UC Santa Barbara
>    * U. of Helsinki, Finland
>    * UNH Sea Grant
>    * Univ. of Texas MarineScience Institute
>    * Virginia Marine Science Museum
>    * Whale Conservation Institute
>    * Wheelock College
>    * Zoo Atlanta
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>       Expand Your Educational Horizons with Telecommunications
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> WhaleNet, in conjunction with research groups, educational
> organizations, and whale watch companies, provides a program to
> enhance the educational opportunities of students.
> 
> WhaleNet projects will include: the Satellite Tagging Observation
> Program where students can observe the movement of whale movements
> with the use of satellite tags; Habitat Wednesday where students can
> accessand use actual research data; WhaleNet Pals Index where
> students can locate and collaborate with students in remote
> locations; WhaleMuse where students can interact in simulations; and
> other interesting programs.
> 
> WhaleNet offers, students and teachers, curriculum resources and
> support, a source of data for interdisciplinary classroom activities
> , and interactive informational support through WhaleNet/EnviroNet
> utilizing telecommunications.
> 
> WhaleNet established Internet communication between researchers and
> students from around the world so that they can share and use
> research data, collaborative learning, and personal field
> experiences to enhance their educationand interest in science.
> WhaleNet provides a system where students, teachers, and researchers
> collect and then compile their data on the WhaleNet server. The data
> is then shared, via WhaleNet, with schools for interdisciplinary
> curricular activities and student research in their respective
> classrooms world-wide.
> 
> WhaleNet is an interdisciplinary program to enhance science
> education and environmental awareness using telecommunications.
> WhaleNet, part of EnviroNet, is an enhancement project funded by the
> National Science Foundation and sponsored by Wheelock College and
> Simmons College in Boston.
> 
> Class activities may be supplemented with information and materials
> made available through WhaleNet. Plans to build a life-sized (55
> ft.) inflatable whale that the students can actually walk through
> are available through WhaleNet. Also available are Interactive
> CD-Rom and curriculum materials and the Elementary Whale Study
> Curriculum (EWSC) developed by Whale Conservation Institute and the
> Discovery Channel, and the booklets Whale Watches as
> Interdisciplinary Teaching Opportunities, The World of Whales,
> Dolphins, and Porpoises -- Interdisciplinary Curriculum Activities
> for Pre-K through High School, and Marine Science Activities on a
> Budget. WhaleNet curricula support continues through the winter
> months by utilizing information from the humpback southern breeding
> areas, WCI Patagonia right whale research, and research information
> on tracking whales, ocean toxics (ECOTOX), and bioacoustics supplied
> by the voyages of the WCI research vessel Odyssey.
> 
> If you are interested in receiving more information, participating
> in the program, or learning more you can contact:
> 
> Michael Williamson
> Williams@whale.simmons.edu
> WhaleNet Coordinator
> Wheelock College
> 200 Riverway
> Boston, MA 02215
> (617)734-5200, X256
> Fax (617)566-7369
> or
> Paul Colombo
> Colombo@whale.simmons.edu
> EnviroNet
> Park Science Center
> Simmons College
> 300 Fenway
> Boston, MA 02115
> (617)521-2665.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> GUEST INSTRUCTIONS FOR EnviroNet / WhaleNet LOGINS
> 
> You may connect through Telnet, www, gopher, or lynx using:
> 
>    * Http://whale.simmons.edu
>    * Gopher://whale.simmons.edu or
>    * TELNET> connect vmsvax.simmons.edu
> 
> to connect to us ( IP# 134.140.112.5), or our direct dial-up # is
> (617)521-3000.
> 
> To Telnet
> 
> The following are some directions to access our network as a
> "guest". Please feel free to browse through our files and let us
> know if you find them a help to your instruction. Bold type
> indicates information that you type.
> 
> username> ENVIRONET
> password >SIMMONS
> [if Local appears--- Local> c vmsvax]
> This will give you the BULLETIN> prompt.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> There are different bulletin boards that we are running:
> 
> WHALENET, ROADKILL, LEADPAINT, ETHNICPLANTS
> ACIDRAIN, OZONE, ENVST-L, LICHENS
> FLU, ENVIRONET, BIRDS, WATERSHED
> ENVIROQUEST, MARINE, HEALTHNET
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> You should access the WhaleNet bulletin board first by typing at the
> prompt BULLETIN> select WHALENET.
> Once the folder has been set to WHALENET you should view the
> directory by typing at the prompt BULLETIN> 1 for the introductory
> message , then at BULLETIN> dir This will give you a list of current
> postings. Type the number of the file and [Return] to view the
> material.
> 
> To access any of the other bulletin boards you would type select
> (space) and then the name of the bulletin board at the BULLETIN>
> prompt. When the board is activated you would simply hit your return
> key to read the messages or you can type dir to see a directory of
> all messages that appear in the board and access any one message by
> its number.
> 
>    * To exit:
>    * BULLETIN> exit
>    * ENVIRONET logged out at 8-MAY-1994 11:30:38.90
>    * Local> lo
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> We hope you enjoy our network and please send us your comments.
> Michael Williamson, WhaleNet Coordinator
> williams@whale.simmons.edu
> Paul D. Colombo, EnviroNet
> colombo@whale.simmons.edu
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Recording Whale Watch Data
> 
> Prior to making reservations for your whale watch, ask the company
> if they are WhaleNet affiliated and/or if they will allow you to
> conduct your research: record Lat/Long positions, collect water
> samples, and/or collect plankton samples. The companies need not be
> affiliated with WhaleNet, but you should be sure that you will be
> allowed to conduct your activities. Ask if the captain will allow a
> student in the pilot house to collect Latitude/Longitude (or LORAN)
> readings, depths, etc.
> 
> Organize your data collecting teams or individuals before you arrive
> at the boat. The excitement of the day, boarding, etc. does not lend
> itself to organizing at dock side.
> 
> Data Sheet
> 
> 1. Fill in as much of the general information (weather, tides, etc.)
> in the data sheet header as possible. Sea state (beaufort scale of
> wind velocity), wave height, and visibility should be recorded at
> sea.
> 
> 2. Take a Latitude/Longitude (Lat/Long) fix about every 15 minutes
> on the way to and from the primary whale watching area beginning at
> the harbor mouth. Indicate N or S latitude (i.e. N lat) and E or W
> longitude (i.e. W long) on the data. This is important because of
> the international nature of the data.
> 
> 3. The time should be recorded for each Lat/Long fix and marine
> mammal observation. Use 24-hr. time for all data entries, i.e. 2:15
> PM would be 14:15. (For afternoon or evening just add 12 to the
> hour.)
> 
> 4. The location is determined by Lat/Long coordinates (i.e. 71 24'W,
> 42 40'N) Two coordinates are used for a fix. Write one coordinate in
> each column under Location.
> 
> 5. Depth can either be recorded by depth sounder on the boat or by
> making a fix on the chart and noting the depth on the chart closest
> to the fix. Many depth sounders do not work well when the boat is
> traveling at higher speeds.
> 
> 6. When a whale is observed record the Species using the Species
> Abbreviation Sheet, i.e. Mn for humpback, Bp for fin whale etc.
> 
> 7. Record the Number of whales in the immediate area (subjective
> distance judgment) around the boat. This can be confusing when there
> are a number of whales in the area. Use a separate line on the data
> sheet for each species in an area, all the other data will be the
> same, i.e. time, Lat/Long, depth, etc.
> 
> 8. Grouping is recorded by listing the number of whales in a group.
> The sum total of grouping must equal the previous Number recorded.
> For instance, if you have 6 humpback whales, you may have 2+2+1+1 if
> there are two pairs and two single animals. a cow/calf pair is
> recorded as c/c.
> 
> 9. Behavior is recorded as feeding, traveling, breaching, flipper
> slapping, lob tailing, spy hop, logging, trumpeting, etc. There are
> more behaviors and some researchers take minute detailed behavioral
> data, but for your purposes that detail may not be necessary.
> 
> 10. Names of humpbacks. Most of the Gulf of Maine population have
> been named to facilitate data transfer by researchers.
> 
> 11. Water Temp in the last column at each sighting and fix, if
> possible.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> Marine Mammals and Turtle Sighting Abbreviations
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> Abbr, No., Common Name, Genus Species
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> * Eg, 1, Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
> * Bm, 2, Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus
> * Bp, 3, Fin Whale, Balaenoptera physalus
> * Bb, 4, Sei Whale, Balaenoptera borealis
> * Be, 5, Bryde's Whale, Balaenoptera edeni
> * Ba, 6, Minke Whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata
> * Mn, 7, Humpback Whale, Megaptera novaeangliae
> * Pc, 8, Sperm Whale, Physeter macrocephalus
> * Kb, 9, Pygmy Sperm Whale, Kogia breviceps
> * Er, 10, Gray Whale, Eschrichtius robustus
> * Dl, 11, Beluga Whale, Delphinapterus leucas
> * Lo, 12, Pacific White Sided Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens
> * Md, 13, Blainville's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon densirostris
> * Me, 14, Gerval's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon europaeus
> * Mm, 15, True's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon mirus
> * Zc, 16, Cuvier's Beaked Whale, Ziphius cavirostris
> * Ha, 17, Northern Bottlenose Whale, Hyperoodon ampullatus
> * Pe, 18, Melon-Headed Whale, Peponocephala electra
> * Fa, 19, Pygmy Killer Whale, Feresa attenuata
> * Px, 20, False Killer Whale, Pseudorca crassidens
> * Oo, 21, Killer Whale, Orcinus orca
> * Gm, 22, Long-Finned Pilot Whale, Globicephala melaena
> * Gx, 23, Short-Finned Pilot Whale, Globicephala macrorhynchus
> * Sb, 24, Rough-Toothed Dolphin, Steno bredanensis
> * Wb, 25, White Beaked Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus albirostris
> * La, 26, Atlantic White Sided Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus acutus
> * Lh, 27, Frasar's Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus hosei
> * Dd, 28, Common Dolphin, Delphinus delphis
> * Tt, 29, Bottlenose Dolphin, Tursiops truncatus
> * Gg, 30, Risso's Dolphin, Grampus grisaus
> * Sp, 31, Spotted Dolphin, Stenella plaglodon
> * Sl, 32, Long-Snouted Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris
> * Sx, 33, Short-Snouted Spinner Dolphin, Stenella clymene
> * Sc, 34, Striped Dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba
> * Pp, 35, Harbor Porpoise, Phocoena phonoena
> * Or, S.36, Walrus, Odobenus rosmarus
> * Pg, S.37, Harp Seal, Phoca groenlandica
> * Cc, S.38, Hooded Seal, Cystophora cristata
> * Hg, S.39, Gray Seal, Halichoerus grypus
> * Pv, S.40, Harbor Seal, Phoca vitulina
> * Tm, S.41, West Indian Manatee, Trichechus manatus
> * Dc, T.42, Leatherback Turtle, Dermochelys corlacea
> * Cc, T.43, Loggerhead Turtle, Caretta caretta
> * Cm, T.44, Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas
> * Lk, T.45, Ridley Turtle, Lepidochelys kempi
> * Ei, T.46, Hawks Bill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata
> * UD, U.47, Unidentified Dolphin/Porpoise,
> * UB, U.48, Unidentified Large Whale,
> * UX, U.49, Unidentified Small Whale
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>> NOTE: Use the first letter of the Genus and species for species
> not listed. <<<
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> WhaleNet Data Input Instructions
> 
> After you access the E-mail address (see WhaleNet Access Sheet)
> input the data as follows.
> 1. Under the heading SUBJECT, enter the data as shown.
> 
> To: WhaleNet@vmsvax.simmons.edu
> CC:
> Subject: Data/NSB/May 4 94/WCI/Pita I/Stoneham MS 6
> 
> Data/Area/Date/Research Group/Vessel/School
> 
> Key:
> 
> Data - identifies the entry as data
> 
> NSB - identifies area [NSB- Northern Stellwagen Bank, SSB - Southern
> Stellwagen Bank, JL-Jeffrey's Ledge, IP-Ipswich Bay, LIS - Long
> Island Sound, VB - Virginia Beach, etc.]
> 
> May 4 94 - date
> WCI - organization Whale Conservation Institute, boats should have a
> research group affiliated with it.
> 
> Pita I- specific vessel name
> 
> Stoneham MS 6- school or group name, grade
> 
> NOTE: This must be consistent for the users' sake. This information
> will appear on the Bulletin Board Directory, and thus, it will
> simplify sorting through all of the many data entries on the
> directory. For instance, if you wish to do a longitudinal study you
> may want to select only the WCI data over a period of time. WCI will
> continually input data throughout the season. If you want to
> concentrate on one specific area, you may select only one area code
> like NSB (Northern Stellwagen Bank), if you want to study from only
> one boat you may select it, or you may select specific dates if you
> want to compare data by dates, etc.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> ** NON-WHALE WATCHING CLASSES **
> 
> If you are a class not going on a whale watch but using the whale
> watch data, use the data sheets to copy data off of the WhaleNet
> Bulletin Board. You can then use the data in the same way as those
> that did go on an actual whale watch.
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Simulated E-Mail Entry
> 
> To: WhaleNet@VMSVAX.simmons.edu
> CC:
> Subject: Data/NSB/ May 4 94/MICS/Pita I/Stoneham MS
> ------------------------------------------
> [data header]
> Vessel - Pita I
> Location of Port- Beverly, Mass., USA
> Date - May 4 94
> School/Org - Stoneham Middle School
> Grade - 6
> Sea State- 2
> Wave Ht.- 1-2 ft
> Wind - NW/10 kts
> Air Temp- 68'F
> Water Temp- 55'F
> Cloud Cover- 10 %
> Visibility- 15 nm
> High Tide (time) - 15:30
> Recorder - Jim Williams
> 
> [data ]
> Time,LatN,LongW,Depth,Species,Number,Grouping,Behavior,Names, Water
> Temp.
> 9:00, 42 40'N, 70 45'W,d,s,n,g,b,n,w
> 9:15, 42 43'N, 70 42'W, d,s,n,g,b,n,w
> 10:30, 42 45'N, 70 40'W,d,s,n,g,b,n,w
> 10:45, 42 23N, 70 25W, 150 ft., Mn, 5, 3+2, logging, Salt Liner,w
> 11:00, 42 45N, 70 22W, d,s,n,g,b,n,w
> 11:15, 42 45N, 70 20W, 100 ft., Mn, 3, 1+1+1, Feeding, Pepper
> 11:15, 42 55N, 70 30W, 100 ft., Bp, 2, 2, feeding
> 11:30, 42 45N, 70 28W, d,s,n,g,b,n,w
> . . .
> 15:20, 40 50N, 70 25W, 250 ft., Ba, 7, 1+1+1+1+1+1+1, feeding
> 
> Day Totals: Hrs ___3__ Miles __47__ Mn __8___ Bp __2___ Ba ___7__
> etc.
> 
> Data Entry:
> Header: Each day's data must contain header information as shown.
> For the Data Header write the name of the entry as shown on the
> Simulated E-Mail Entry (above), and then type the information,i.e.
> Vessel - Pita I.
> 
> Data: The first line of the data entry contains the column headings
> on the Data Sheet separated by the , (comma). Each of the following
> lines are a single line from the data sheet with each column entry
> separated by the , (comma).
> 
> Data input example explanations using last line of entry (above):
> 15:20 = 3:20 PM - use 24 hr time
> 40 23' & 70 25' - Lat/Long coordinates taken from ship's
> electronics, i.e. LORAN
> 250 ft.- depth taken either from location (fix) on chart or depth
> sounder on boat.
> Ba - species Minke (a listing of abbreviations will accompany
> packet)
> 7 - number of species of whale in area of boat
> 1+1+1+1+1+1+1 - grouping of whales, sometimes singles, pairs etc.
> feeding - observed behavior (a listing of common behaviors will
> accompany packet)
> Use appropriate letters for space holders in data(
> i.e.d,s,n,g,b,n,w) see above.
> Day Totals - for day try to eliminate duplicate sightings of same
> whales.
> Hours from leaving to arriving at harbor mouth.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> WhaleNet Sample & Start-up Activities
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> Activity 1: Navigation
> 
> Simple navigation methods can be used to involve mathematics. Using
> latitude and longitude, or a system of navigation called LORAN (Long
> Range Aid to Navigation) the ship's position can be plotted very
> accurately on a navigation chart. The ship's track can be plotted on
> a chart by taking a position check or fix periodically by recording
> the time and ship's Lat/Long coordinates. Prior to your trip
> laminate your chart or cover it with clear contact paper. The
> students can use water soluble fine tip markers to plot the fixes
> and course as the day progresses. Different colors can be used to
> indicate different species sightings, etc. The chart can be reused
> when the fixes are washed off. (Use Lat/Long if possible.)
> 
> With the plot of the ship's course a number of activities can be
> undertaken. Plot the vessel's research track and calculate: the
> distance covered, the rate of the vessel's travel from point to
> point (D=R*T, " a minute's a mile the world around"), the depth of
> water at various points can be found by checking the depth on the
> chart at the point of the fix, and the topography of the research
> track can be observed (see bathymetry below).
> 
> Students can plot the track of the boat by recording the Lat/Long
> coordinates at preset time intervals, i.e. every 15 minutes and/or
> at every sighting of marine mammals, and then plotting these points
> (taking a fix) on a chart of the area. (Charts are available for
> $13.00 or a bathymetric (fishing) chart for $3.00 through boat yards
> or boating magazines. The bathymetric chart gives a better
> visualization of the bottom topography and may be more helpful if a
> study of bottom topography is planned. The bathymetric chart also
> has some LORAN lines on it, but not as many as the navigation chart.
> NOTE: you only need the Lat/Long or two LORAN coordinates to plot a
> position.)
> 
> Using the research track, students should note locations, depths,
> topography, etc. where marine mammals are observed along with the
> behavior and activity observed.
> 
> Activity 2: Water Testing
> 
> Water testing is an important part of oceanography and whale
> research. Activities such as testing the water temperature, density
> and salinity are commonly measured qualities of sea water. To
> collect a water sample notify crew members, wait until the boat
> STOPS COMPLETELY, drop a bucket with a line attached to the handle
> overboard and bring up a water sample. Use a thermometer to measure
> the temperature, and a hydrometer to measure the density. With the
> density and temperature, the salinity can be determined using
> temp/density/salinity charts or graphs.
> 
> The color of the water, sea state (wave height), wind velocity and
> direction, and air temperature are also important bits of
> information to the researcher. This information is listed on the
> data sheet.
> 
> Activity 3: Plankton Tow and Analysis
> 
> A plankton tow and analysis explains a great deal about why the
> whales are where they are. The plankton can be examined with hand
> lenses or microscopes, and depending on the class age various
> degrees of plankton analysis can be conducted. Data on density of
> plankton, identification of plankton types, etc. can be included.
> 
> A discussion and development of food chains and food webs would be a
> natural follow-up to the plankton tow. Phytoplankton (plants) and
> zoo-plankton (animals) can be observed under normal conditions. If
> only one plankton net can be purchased choose a phytoplankton net.
> It collects both plant and animal plankton.
> 
> Activity 4: Data Collection
> 
> Data collection should be made on: the location of the observation,
> the species observed, the number of each species, behavior of the
> organism, and any other information that might be important.
> 
> Data sheets should be photocopied from the one included in advance
> of the trips and research groups can be assigned in any manner
> appropriate to the class. Groups can either be assigned to take data
> for the class or groups can be assigned to take data throughout the
> trip. It would be suggested that only one person at a time be
> assigned to record the position coordinates (Lat/Long) in the pilot
> house, and the captain should be contacted and talked with about the
> best procedure prior to the trip. Some vessels have Lat/Long or
> LORAN receivers in the public cabin, inquire at the time you make
> your reservations.
> 
> For more class involvement, additional data can be collected on the
> pollution (floating trash) and bird sightings. The Pollution Data
> Table should include time sighted, location, type of trash, amount
> of trash, composition of trash, etc. The data of the times sighted
> can be coordinated with the position recordings to approximate the
> location of the trash sightings. Totals of the trash sightings
> should be included after the whale sighting information. Bird
> sightings can also be recorded in a similar fashion. There is a bird
> sighting bulletin board in EnviroNet, see the EnviroNet booklet for
> procedures to input bird data.
> 
> Activity 5: Photo-Identification of Whales
> 
> Photo-identification photographs of humpback whales taken on the
> cruise should be recorded as follows: date, location, photo taken by
> whom, what roll number of film (number each roll of film with the
> initials of the photographer & roll number such as: JMW/95-001), and
> what number on the roll. The photographs can be used later to
> identify the whale using a humpback whale catalogue or they can be
> mailed to Allied Whale, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine
> to be entered into the Humpback Whale Catalogue data base.
> 
> Activity 6: Mathematics
> 
> Plot the complete research track on a chart. How many miles did the
> trip cover? What was the average speed of the boat from fix to fix,
> for the entire trip? What was the heading (compass direction) on
> each leg of the trip? How many sighting were made for each hour of
> the trip? (This is the "catch effort" used by whalers to compare the
> efficiency of a trip.) This method can also be used to compare
> different trips, on different days, locations, boats, etc.
> 
> Activity 7: Bathymetry
> 
> Using graph paper placed along each leg of the research track the
> bottom topography can be plotted and displayed. Fold a piece of
> graph paper along a line about one inch from the edge of the paper.
> Place the graph paper on the track line drawn on the chart and using
> a predetermined scale for depth on the vertical axis, plot the depth
> of the bottom on the (vertical) Y-axis vs. appropriate/convenient
> points on the (horizontal) X-axis. Connect the strip profiles for
> each leg of the cruise together to show the bottom topography of the
> entire trip.
> 
> Return to the bottom topography profile and note where on the
> surface what species were sighted and what the behavior observed
> was, i.e. feeding, logging, traveling, etc. Is there a pattern of
> behavior of the whales or the location of the whales to the bottom
> topography? Are sightings usually made over a specific type of
> bottom? Analyze the data from your trip.
> 
> Activity 8: Topographic Model of the Bottom
> 
> Construct a model of Stellwagen Bank. Draw lines perpendicular to
> the ridge line of the bank about one inch apart. Have students use
> graph paper to make a profile of the bottom on each line. Glue the
> graph paper to pieces of cardboard and cut out the profiles. Line
> the cardboard profiles up one inch apart in clay or similar
> substance to hold up the cardboard, and cover with damp cloth or
> paper. Press the cloth or paper down gently to the contour of the
> cardboard, allow to dry, and spray with paint and allow to dry. Use
> your imagination!
> 
> Activity 9: Analysis of Whale Watch Data
> 
> Suggestions for analysis: (1) compare "catch efforts" (number of
> sightings of a species for each hour on the whale watch) for
> different days, different species, etc.; (2) compare the range of
> behaviors of species on a given day; (3) compare data for Jeffrey's
> Ledge and Stellwagen Bank on a given day or week; (4) compare
> numbers of cow/calf pairs on given days; (5) calculate the number of
> whales with killer whale scars; (6) compare the depths where the
> different species were observed; (7) compare where most of the
> sightings were, on the bank or ledge, over the deep water, etc. or
> (8) compare numbers of sightings vs. sea state, cloud cover, wind
> velocity, etc.
> 
> Activity 10: Analysis of Marine Pollution
> 
> Collect data on pollution and floating debris by using a data sheet
> similar to the marine mammal data sheet, but substitute Object for
> Species and Composition for Grouping. Up-load the data using the
> same procedure as for the marine mammals but use Pollution Data in
> place of Data in the subject header. We will also be collecting
> Coast Sweep data in the future.
> 
> Activity 11: Analysis of Pelagic Birds
> 
> Collect data on pelagic birds by using a data sheet similar to the
> marine mammal data sheet. Up-load the information by substituting
> Bird Data in the subject header.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> ** NON-WHALE WATCHING CLASSROOMS **
> 
> If you are one of the classrooms not going on a whale watch but
> using the whale watch data, use the data sheets to copy data off of
> the WhaleNet Bulletin Board. You can then use the data in the same
> way as those that did go on an actual whale watch.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> WhaleNet Supplementary Materials
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> The listed materials may be purchased to supplement your classroom
> curriculum.
> 
> Marine Science Activities on a Budget (booklet) - Contains a
> cross-section of oceanographic activities that can be altered to
> accommodate many grade levels. $10.00
> 
> The World of Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises - Interdisciplinary
> Curriculum Units for Pre-K through High School (book) - This
> contains 200+ pages of interdisciplinary activities, bibliographies,
> etc. suitable for a wide range of interests, abilities, and grade
> levels,$20.00.
> 
> How to Build an Inflatable (55 ft.) Fin Whale (booklet) -
> Instructions on how to build a 55 foot long model of a whale that
> can be carried in a duffel bag by one person. Students and teachers
> can walk inside. Estimated cost for materials is between $40.00 and
> $50.00, $8.00
> 
> Marine Science Bibliography (pamphlet) - Extensive bibliography for
> a wide range of grade levels and interests from general knowledge,
> children's books, to scientific information for the marine mammal
> biologist. $3.00
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
Be sure to include your name and address, and 
Send check payable to:
Michael Williamson
20 Moynihan Rd.
S. Hamilton, MA 01982