Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2001 09:16:37 EDT

From: cole%Delaware@noaa.gov

 

Subject: btc 2001 8/10

The Delaware II left Woods Hole at 1000 on Tuesday, headed for the Bay of Fundy.

We made a dog leg in order to repeat the set of six CTD/OPC stations across Wilkinson Basin, this time doing them at night to see if there would be the samecopepod layer separation that we saw in the BOF last trip. There wasn'tanything very distinct. The copepods appeared to be less concentratedvertically than in the BOF, though perhaps as numerous. We also repeated a setof four stations bisecting Jordan Basin during the day Wednesday. We maintaineda visual watch between stations, but despite ideal sighting conditions, nothing was seen except blue sharks, tuna and mola. At the bottom of this messageis a list of the station locations.

We arrived in the BOF early Thursday and began a broad scale survey up ourwestern most trackline. Sighting conditions deteriorated by mid-morning as we got further north, with the visibility reduced to about 3 nmi by 0900. We completed our trackline about 1030, and then made for the north end of

Campobello Island to get in the lee of a forecasted 25 knot SW wind. Though the wind never came, the visibility remained reduced where we were, so we ran the boats down to Lubec to pick up another observer who the New England had kindly offered to bring out to us had the weather been better. We spent about an hour talking with the folks at the research station, who set usup with some good data sheets and advice before we headed back out to the ship.

 

Late in the afternoon we tested the sonic transmitter component of our TDR tags, which worked very well. The setup includes a transmitter that is mounted next to the TDR on the tag, and a directional hydrophone and receiver which we deploy from a small boat. A nice feature of the system is that the receiver displays the depth of the transmitter. We put a tag on the CTD rosette and lowered it to various depths while a small boat with the hydrophone and receiver listened from different distances. We found the system to be very accurate both giving direction to and depth of the tag from at least a half mile away--we ran out of to try greater distances.

At 0500 this morning we moved to 4442N 6622W in preparation for starting tagging ops. Weather conditions were not good for tagging, however, so we moved south began doing some more broad scale stations running north up the 6627.5W line. We are currently keeping the speed to 8 knots through the water (6 knots ground) with a visual team topsides while we run with the wind. We'll broad scale work until conditions deteriorate further--25 knot winds predicted as the day progresses, but we'll see....

Tim

 

Wilkinson and Jordan Basin stations

42 29.26 69 59.20 WK01

42 31.98 69 51.23 WK02

42 34.69 69 43.25 WK03

42 37.41 69 35.27 WK04

42 40.13 69 27.28 WK05

42 42.85 69 19.28 WK06

43 12.95 67 50.39 JD01

43 28.55 67 44.43 JD02

43 44.14 67 38.45 JD03

43 59.74 67 32.44 JD04

Bay of Fundy Stations

44 49.98 66 36.00 BF10

44 45.00 66 36.00 BF11

44 40.01 66 36.00 BF12

44 35.02 66 36.00 BF13

44 30.03 66 36.00 BF14

44 25.04 66 36.00 BF15

44 49.98 66 27.54 BF20

44 45.00 66 27.54 BF21

44 40.01 66 27.54 BF22

44 35.02 66 27.54 BF23

44 30.03 66 27.54 BF24

44 25.04 66 27.54 BF25

44 49.98 66 19.14 BF30

44 45.00 66 19.14 BF31

44 40.01 66 19.14 BF32

44 35.02 66 19.14 BF33

44 30.03 66 19.14 BF34

44 25.04 66 19.14 BF35

44 49.92 66 10.68 BF40

44 44.94 66 10.68 BF41

44 39.95 66 10.68 BF42

44 34.96 66 10.68 BF43

44 29.97 66 10.68 BF44